FutureStarr

How Long After Taking Plan B Can I Resume Breastfeeding ORR

How Long After Taking Plan B Can I Resume Breastfeeding ORR

How Long After Taking Plan B Can I Resume Breastfeeding

via GIPHY

Plan B is generally considered safe for people who have breastfed before and for women with fully functioning uteruses. This means that if you have never breastfed before, have a uterus that appears to be abnormal or abnormal functioning, or were not breastfeeding before taking Plan B, then you should wait until you've weaned your baby to resume breastfeeding.

Woman

Plan B can be used safely during breastfeeding with no changes to your breastfeeding schedule. Ella can also be used safely during breastfeeding. The CDC recommends that women delay breastfeeding for 24 hours after taking Ella as some of this medication is excreted in the breastmilk. The strongest concentration of Ella in the breastmilk occurs for 1 to 3 hours after taking it, so some providers recommend pumping and dumping only once. There are no known complications for babies who do breastfeed right after the mother has taken emergency contraception.

In a cohort study of 71 women who took levonorgestrel as a postcoital contraceptive no obvious decrease in milk supply was found after the drug was used according to maternal reports. 75% of mothers re-initiated breastfeeding before 8 hours after the dose. None noticed any adverse effect in their infants (Polakow-Farkash 2013). One study demonstrated that levonorgestrel passes into breastmilk but in minimal quantities (Jatlaoui 2016). Polakow-Farkash reports that the study findings support the safety of using levonorgestrel as an emergency contraceptive during lactation without the need for withholding breastfeeding. (Source: www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk)

Milk

In a cohort study of 71 women who took levonorgestrel as a postcoital contraceptive no obvious decrease in milk supply was found after the drug was used according to maternal reports. 75% of mothers re-initiated breastfeeding before 8 hours after the dose. None noticed any adverse effect in their infants (Polakow-Farkash 2013). One study demonstrated that levonorgestrel passes into breastmilk but in minimal quantities (Jatlaoui 2016). Polakow-Farkash reports that the study findings support the safety of using levonorgestrel as an emergency contraceptive during lactation without the need for withholding breastfeeding.

There is no information on the amount of the newer drug Ulipristal (ellaOne®) passing into breastmilk although data from the manufacturer indicates that the amounts in breastmilk are low. World Health Organization guidelines state that women who are breastfeeding can generally use ulipristal as an emergency contraceptive. The manufacturer reports that after this medication was given to 12 breastfeeding women for emergency contraception the mean concentration of ulipristal and its metabolite in milk were 22.7 ng/mL and 4.49 ng/mL in the first 24 hours. Using this data the mean ulipristal concentration in the first 24 hours of therapy, the relative infant dose was 0.8% well below the 10% level considered as safe (Hale). The milk from these mothers was not given to the babies. (Source: www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk)

 

 

Related Articles