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Sweet Flag Grass

Sweet Flag Grass

Sweet Flag Grass

Some people foods like chocolate and pudding are essentially dead on arrival because they are particularly difficult to decay. Others, like dried legumes, do not even need to be cooked. But sweet flag-grass, which is also known as sugar grass, is so tough that it must be cooked in order to be eaten.Japanese sweet flag grass is one of those plants with a proclivity for water which also happen to resemble flowing water. This makes it much admired and appreciated, at least in my book. When I design around a water feature, whether it’s a tumbling waterfall, a bubbling urn or a meandering dry creek bed, I most always employ Acorus gramineus because this evergreen grass-like plant mimics the way water flows, cascades, and spreads out in a carefree way.

Flag

Above: When landscape architect William Dangar designed a garden for his own family (near Sydney, Australia), he incorporated a small backyard pond fringed by Japanese sweet flag grass. See more in Downsizing a House to Expand the Garden: At Home with Landscape Architect William Dangar. Photograph by Prue Ruscoe, courtesy of William Dangar.Native to Japan and China, Acorus generally grows in USDA hardiness zones 6 to 9, with a few cultivars appropriate as far north as zones 4 and as far south as zone 11. The plant also goes by the common names of sweet flag and calamus. The term "flag" derives from the Middle English word flagge, meaning "reed."Golden Variegated Sweet Flag creates a beautiful mat of bright green and gold and that’s plenty of color to jazz up shady spots or moist, sunny areas.

Acorus gramineus ‘Ogon’ grows in a tufted mound with grasslike, narrow blades. Plant it in moist areas to create a dense ground cover, or use it to accent water features or ponds. Golden Variegated Sweet Flag spreads very slowly by rhizomes. As with others in the Acorus genus, its leaves emit a fresh citrus scent when pinched or bruised.Commonly, sweet flag is a grass green color. While it isn't the showiest of plants, it does add a textural component to a garden or container. Along with the common green types, there are several other varieties of sweet flag in assorted and variegated colors. Some are variegated with a golden stripe on one side and a green stripe on the other. Most varieties are a vibrant chartreuse yellow, which contrasts with rich-colored but not showy flowers. You can also find white variegated varieties as well. The tiny, insignificant yellow-green flowers bloom on lateral flower spikes; you will see these blossoms from spring to early summer, but they typically are only develop when growing in water. (Source: www.bhg.com)

 

 

 

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