FutureStarr

St John's Wort Flower

St John's Wort Flower

St John's Wort Flower

The floral world would be very different without one of the most popular and versatile plants of our time: Polycarpaea rosea or St John's wort. Here's everything you should know about this plant before considering it for your garden plantings.St John's wort is named as such because it commonly flowers, blossoms and is harvested at the time of the summer solstice in late June, around St John's Feast Day on 24 June. The herb would be hung on house and stall doors on St John's Feast day to ward off evil spirits and to safeguard against harm and sickness to people and live-stock. Alternatively, there may be a connection with the Knights Hospitaller. The genus name Hypericum is possibly derived from the Greek words hyper (above) and eikon (picture), in reference to the tradition of hanging plants over religious icons in the home during St John's Day.

John

St John's wort is named as such because it commonly flowers, blossoms and is harvested at the time of the summer solstice in late June, around St John's Feast Day on 24 June. The herb would be hung on house and stall doors on St John's Feast day to ward off evil spirits and to safeguard against harm and sickness to people and live-stock. Alternatively, there may be a connection with the Knights Hospitaller. The genus name Hypericum is possibly derived from the Greek words hyper (above) and eikon (picture), in reference to the tradition of hanging plants over religious icons in the home during St John's Day. Increased respiration and heart rate is typically observed while one of the early signs of St John's wort poisoning is an abnormal increase in body temperature. Affected animals will lose weight, or fail to gain weight; young animals are more affected than old animals.

In severe cases death may occur, as a direct result of starvation, or because of secondary disease or septicaemia of lesions. Some affected animals may accidentally drown. Poor performance of suckling lambs (pigmented and non-pigmented) has been noted, suggesting a reduction in milk production, or the transmission of a toxin in the milk. It may result in an undesirable flavor.St. John's wort is an easy plant to grow, being tolerant of a number of challenging conditions. Thus its status as a weed in the opinion of many gardeners. If it has any Achilles heel at all, it is an overly wet soil. You may have to baby young plants for a while, but, once established, St. John's wort will survive on its own. In fact, your main maintenance chore with established plants will be keeping them in check. (Source:www.thespruce.com)

 

 

Related Articles