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Solomon Seal Root

Solomon Seal Root

Solomon Seal Root

The appropriate dose of Solomon's seal depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Solomon's seal. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Seal

A variety of Solomon’s seal is native to N. America, Europe, Siberia, and Asia. In the US it is found through the East Coast (predominantly Georgia, S. Carolina to Maine) spanning across the Midwest reaching Wyoming, Nebraska, Dakotas. Solomon’s Seal grows easily with rich moist soil in deciduous woodlands with full to partial shade. It grows in clumps with stems ranging to 3 feet in length. The alternate leaves have parallel monocot veins along the stem. The delicate creamy white cluster flowers are found hanging below the stem. These clusters of 2-7 flowers produce fruit with 3-4 seeds that become blackish blue to purplish red. When harvesting the roots, it is important to approach the plant with respect using fingers to pick the root at the back behind the stem, so the growing portion is not impacted. John Gerard, 1597 was responsible for introducing Solomon’s Seal to the English medicinal orbit, although it was slow to be adopted in America as described by King’s American Dispensatory, 1898 “although used with asserted benefit in several diseases by many physicians, yet the American species of these plants have received but little attention as to their true therapeutical characteristics.”

Having researched this plant, and noticed its use in Traditional Chinese Medicine, I agree that it is underutilized in Western herbalism although both Mathew Wood and jim mcdonald extol its virtues as a superb remedy for treating injuries to the musculoskeletal system. The term Polygonatum, derives from Greek, “poly” meaning “many” and “gony,” “gonato” referring to “knee.” Solomon’s Seal is true to doctrine of signatures as the “white roots appear to be bony, joints, knuckles and vertebra.” One can observe the knobby markings, swellings, scars and joints from previous years which are said to be similar to stamps or “seals.” There are numerous thoughts as to the origin of “seal” one being that the Hebrew characters seen on the root scars bear a resemblance to King Solomon’s ancient Hebrew seal. His seal demonstrates its value to man as a medicinal root as he “knew the diversities of plants and virtues of the root.” (Source: www.eclecticschoolofherbalmedicine.com)

 

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