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Ramp plant flower

Ramp plant flower

Ramp plant flower

Allium tricoccum was first named as such in 1789 by the Scottish botanist William Aiton, in Hortus Kewensis, a catalog of plants cultivated in London's Kew botanic garden. The species had been introduced to Britain in 1770. The specific epithet tricoccum refers to the possession of three seeds.

Plant

Ramps grow best in shady areas with damp soil throughout the year (not just the growing season) and highly organic soil with plenty of decomposed leaf litter. They tolerate full to partial shade and medium wet to medium dry soil. To cultivate these plants, grow from seed, bulbs, or young plants. Since seed germination can take up to 18 months and plants may not get large enough to harvest for 7 years, the latter is often preferred. Bulbs can be purchased or transplanted in early spring to obtain harvestable plants in 2 to 3 years (from large – greater than ½ inch in diameter – bulbs). Transplantation can also be done in the fall as long as the soil is kept moist until the ground freezes. Plant ramps along with other native species, such as wild ginger (Asarum canadense) or black cohosh (Actaea racemosa), that will grow later in the season to cover the area after the leaves die back.

Ramps are perennials that, like other members of the onion family, grow from bulbs. Ramps grow in close groups that are strongly rooted below the surface of the soil. The leaves are smooth and light green (the perfect color for early spring), with deep purple tinges towards the bottom of the stem. Like many other early emerging plants, ramps are considered spring ephemerals. This is because the leaves only exist for a few short weeks after emerging in early spring before turning yellow and dying back. This adaption allows the ramps to use the early spring sunlight to grow, and store energy in the root system and bulbs before the trees leaf out and shade the forest floor where the ramps live. )Keep in mind that the growth period for ramps is limited to only a few weeks in the spring, during which time the plant is dependent on having adequate light, moisture, and nutrients for survival. (Source:content.ces.ncsu.edu)

 

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