FutureStarr

Purple Poppy Mallow

Purple Poppy Mallow

Purple Poppy Mallow

This dessert is traditionally made with condensed milk, but it can be made with a lot of other things too. Recipes like this one (from a great blog) can be found online, but many will love to try making it themselves in order to see how the final product tastes.Purple Poppy Mallow, also known as Winecup, is a widespread native plant, although some regions by introduction. Its range today stretches from Oregon to Florida, Texas to Michigan. It is typically located in open woods, thickets, and on rocky hills. Because of its long taproot, Purple Poppy Mallow is very drought-resistant, but will also become difficult to move after just a few years so choose your spot wisely.

Poppy

Purple Poppy Mallow is mat-forming like Bush's Poppy Mallow, making excellent native ground covers. Its stems spread out about three feet from the base and under a foot tall. The flowers are chalice-shaped (thus the name Winecup) and are about 1.5-2.5 inches in diameter. Their petals are white at the base and gradually become maroon or deep pink at the tips. These flowers open in the morning, but close in the evening. Purple Poppy Mallow is one of the host plants of the Gray Hairstreak. After pollination, the flowers remain closed. In ideal conditions, relatively dry, well-drained soil and full sun, it will self-seed well. We sell this seed dehulled, as in the seed image.This non-native wildflower has naturalized in only a few scattered counties in the northern two-thirds of Illinois (see Distribution Map), where it is uncommon.

It is adventive from areas further to the west or southwest of the state. Habitats include dry prairies, areas along railroads and roadsides, and abandoned fields. In these habitats, the ground vegetation is relatively low and sparse. In Illinois, Purple Poppy Mallow is often planted in flower gardens because of its attractive flowers.Pink poppy mallow (C. alcaeoides), also called pale poppy mallow or plains poppy mallow, is easily distinguished from the others because its petals are nearly white to light pink or pale lavender. Its racemes are sometimes so condensed as to appear as stalked clusters or umbels; the calyx (conjoined sepals) is not subtended by small bracts. It is scattered mostly in the western half of Missouri and has been introduced at scattered locations elsewhere in the state, but apparently absent from the Bootheel lowlands. Occurs in dry upland forests, upland prairies, and calcareous glades; also stream banks, roadsides, railroads, old quarries, and pastures. (Source: mdc.mo.gov)

 

 

 

Related Articles