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Packera Obovata

Packera Obovata

Packera Obovata

We are a Vancouver-based joint venture, founded by Marko Anttila and Tammy Hryczweski in 2017. We are passionate about construction, design, and small-scale manufacturing. You can find our latest creations at www. packera. co.Six additional species of Packera occur in Arkansas: golden ragwort (P. aurea), cress-leaf groundsel (P. glabella), balsam ragwort (P. paupercula), prairie ragwort ( P. plattensis), Great Plains ragwort (P. tampicana), and woolly ragwort (P. tomentosa)––all with a similar growth habit and yellow flowers. Round-leaf ragwort can be distinguished by a combination of its obovate and short-petiolate basal leaves, rounded tips of the lower cauline leaves, generally glabrous stems, and woolly tomentose pubescence only at leaf bases and on the small leaves (bracts) within the inflorescence. Round-leaf ragwort most closely resembles P. aurea, except P. aurea has indented (cordate) basal leaves on long petioles.

Packera

Packera obovata is an erect perennial herb growing to a height of up to 2 ft (60 cm). It has fibrous roots and a basal rosette of leaves up to 1 ft (30 cm) across. They are mid-green and hairless, circular, oval or obovate in shape and have crinkly toothed margins. The leaf stalks are about the same length as the leaf blades, green or purplish in colour and usually hairless; some have slight winging and may be cobwebby-pubescent. The flower stalk may also be cobwebby at the base, and bears two or three alternate pinnatifid leaves with irregular lobes. It is topped by a flat-headed panicle, each individual flower-head being up to 0.75 in (2 cm) in diameter. The flower-head has a single row of linear-lanceolate green bracts, eight to sixteen yellow ray-florets and a central mound of orange-yellow disk florets.

Both ray and disk florets are followed by brown achenes set in tufts of white hair. The achenes are dispersed by the wind, and the plant can also spread by vegetative growth from stolons or rhizomes.Faunal Associations: The nectar and pollen of the flowerheads attract cuckoo bees (Nomada spp.), Halictid bees (Augochlorella spp., Halictus spp., Lasioglossum spp.), Andrenid bees (Andrena spp.), Syrphid flies, Tachinid flies, and miscellaneous beetles. One bee species, Andrena gardineri, is a specialist pollinator (oligolege) of Packera spp. (ragworts). Another insect, Neacoryphus bicrucis (White-Crossed Seed Bug), feeds on the seeds of these plants, while the caterpillars of an uncommon butterfly, Calephelis borealis (Northern Metalmark), feed on the foliage of Spoon-Leaved Ragwort in particular. The foliage of this and other ragworts is toxic to many mammalian herbivores, although sheep are more tolerant of it (Georgia, 1913). (Source: www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

 

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