FutureStarr

Lyrata Plant

Lyrata Plant

Lyrata Plant

Other - Many people notice that their Ficus Lyrata plant may show brown spots on the foliage or drop it's leaves. Both of these characteristics are natural and are apart of a normal maturing plant as long its as not happening in abundance. The plant has a sap which when exposed to air (and on top of leaves) causes browning. Excessive browning and dropping leaves may also occur due to improper air flow and lack of humidity in the home; so be aware of this. Adding a humidifier close by the plant or misting around it (NOT directly on the leaves) will help with humidity. Once a month, be sure to thoroughly water the plant to flush out any salts, toxins, or impurities that build up in the soil. Ficus are notorious for being sensitive to chemicals. In chance of pests, use the least chemically potent pesticide.

Plant

The fiddle-leaf fig (Ficus lyrata) is a popular indoor tree featuring very large, heavily veined, and glossy violin-shaped leaves that grow upright on a sleek trunk. A fiddle-leaf fig is perfect as a focal point of a room if you can situate it in a floor-standing container where the plant is allowed to grow to at least 6 feet tall. (Most indoor specimens reach around 10 feet tall.) It's a fairly fast grower and can be potted at any point in the year if you're like most gardeners acquiring a nursery plant to keep indoors. Keep in mind this gorgeous plant is toxic to cats and dogs.Ficus Lyrata says opulence, it’s a complete A lister! A large indoor plant is how we know it, but the Fiddle leaf fig plant originates in the rainforests of central and western Africa and it has become a favourite for those who like to buy house plants as an eye-catching centrepiece or bold statement for a room. At home on the cover of a magazine, the Fiddle leaf fig is the epitome of style.

The species is native to Africa, where it grows in warm and wet regions, but has been introduced and is now widely cultivated both outdoors and indoors. F. lyrata grows in lowland and premontane humid rainforests (Lansky and Paavilainen, 2010; Vascular Plants of Antioquia, 2014). It is cultivated as an ornamental in parks and gardens of Nicaragua and the Philippines (Madulid, 1995; Flora of Nicaragua, 2014), and is used as an indoor house plant (Madulid, 1995; Whistler, 2000; Missouri Botanical Garden Plant Finder, 2014; Flora of Pakistan, 2014). Of course, we should mention here that perhaps beyond the artistic, the word also has a gastronomic hue, since by the word ‘λύρα’ Ancient Greeks also called the delicious fish Trigla lyra, piper gurnard, a triglid fish. Apparently the name of the lyrata species, is extremely attributable to the shape of the leaves of the plant, as well as the lyra, the dorsal and abdominal fin of the piper gurnard. (Source: www.kalliergeia.com)

 

 

Related Articles