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Lipine

Lipine

Lipine

Lipine is a lip plumper that offers a unique flavor selection, too. It comes in chocolate, orange, and mint flavors, and is compatible with all skin types.The genus Lupinus L. and, in particular, its North American species were divided by Sereno Watson (1873) into three sections: Lupinus, Platycarpos, and Lupinnelus. Differences in habitat and in the number of ovules were the basis for this classification. A majority of the perennial and annual species from the American continent described by Watson were referred to Lupinus. Some annual species with two ovules in the ovary and two seeds in the pod (L. densiflorus, L. microcarpus, etc.) were attributed to the Platycarpos section. Section Lupinnelus consisted of one species (L. uncialis), with axillary and solitary flowers, scarcely reflexed banner, and also with two ovules in the ovary.

Flower

fixing nitrogen from the air in a soil form useful for other plants. Herbaceous lupines can reach up to 1.25 metres (4 feet) tall and have low palmately divided leaves. Most species have compact upright flower spikes, and through hybridization and selection some highly ornamental varieties have been developed. In Europe and elsewhere, many tall species of lupines are woody shrubs that reach more than 2 metres (6.5 feet) in height.Wildflower watchers everywhere celebrate when springtime lupines come into bloom and create colorful spikes in gardens. There is nothing subtle about the shape and color of hybrid lupines. The telltale look is a tall, showy spire of flowers that can come in a multitude of colors. The foliage resembles palm leaves with seven to 10 leaflet segments each. This fast-growing flower is available as both an annual and a perennial, which is usually potted.The growth habit of lupine is different from other grain legumes. Emergence is epigeal (cotyledons emerge above ground before development of true leaves), and early seedling growth is considerably slower than later vegetative stages.

Maximum vegetative growth rate occurs during flowering. The main stem and each branch usually terminate in an inflorescence, which is a simple raceme with varying numbers of flowers. Even aher the main stem flowering has ceased, the plant can develop lateral secondary as well as tertiary flower sets from a sequence of lateral branches. Species and cultivars differ in ability to set pods on these secondary and tertiary branches. The process is highly influenced by environmental conditions.Results from trials conducted in Minnesota and Wisconsin (Table 1) show that planting in early to mid-April results in maximum grain yields. Large yield reductions from plantings after early May have been reported at several locations. The primary requirement is to plant early enough to complete flowering before the excessive heat of early summer. Planting too early, when cold affects the seed, can sometimes result in vernalization which causes a determinant growth habit, reduced plant growth, and lower yield. Since the importance of this process is poorly understood, it is recommended that growers plant in mid-April in most of Minnesota & Wisconsin, but when freezing temperatures begin moderating. (Source: hort.purdue.edu)

 

 

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