FutureStarr

Jack in the-pulpit spiritual meaning

Jack in the-pulpit spiritual meaning

Jack in the-pulpit spiritual meaning

Conditions Comments: Jack-in-the-pulpit is an excellent woodsgarden plant, very easy to cultivate and requiring very little care. It thrives under a variety of conditions, but grows most vigorously in moist, shady, seasonally wet locations. A heavy, leafy wintercover should be left in place. Warning: Containing needle-like calcium oxalate crystals and perhaps other acrid substances, the berries, foliage, and roots of this plant will cause painful irritation of the mouth and throat if ingested. The roots can cause blisters on skin if touched.

Plant

The Arum family (Araceae), of which it is a member, contains 27 genera and six other species within the genus Arisaema. All species -A. dracontium/ green dragon, A. speciosum/ cobra lily, / A. japonica/ Japanese arisaema, / A. heterophyllum/ A. tortuosum/ arisaema - possess the characteristic and exotic flower structures. Jack-in-the pulpit is pollinated by small flies and flowers from March through June depending on locale. The flower is an unusual green and maroon striped spathe surrounding a fleshy, maroon-colored spadix that bears the tiny, embedded flowers.

is a herbaceous perennial plant growing from a corm. It is a highly variable species typically growing 30–65 centimetres (12–26 in) in height with three-part leaves and flowers contained in a spadix that is covered by a hood. It is native to eastern North America, occurring in moist woodlands and thickets from Nova Scotia west to Minnesota, and south to southern Florida and Texas. The leaves are trifoliate, with groups of three leaves growing together at the top of one long stem produced from a corm; each leaflet is 8–15 centimetres (3.1–5.9 in) long and 3–7 centimetres (1.2–2.8 in) broad. Plants are sometimes confused with poison-ivy especially before the flowers appear or non-flowering plants. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

 

Related Articles