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How many teaspoonor

How many teaspoonor

How many teaspoonor

History/origin: The teaspoon was originally used as a unit of Apothecaries' measure and was equal to 1 fluid dram, ¼ of a tablespoon, or 1/8 of a fluid ounce. This definition of the teaspoon is smaller than the definitions of the teaspoon used today. This is partially due to tea being expensive in 1660s England, resulting in smaller teacups and teaspoons. Once England began importing tea from China in 1710, reducing the cost of tea, the size of teacups and teaspoons increased, and by the 1730s, became 1/3, rather than 1/4 the size of a tablespoon. This is the same size ratio in use today in both the US customary and metric teaspoons (though the actual volumes differ).

Teaspoon

History/origin: The teaspoon was originally used as a unit of Apothecaries' measure and was equal to 1 fluid dram, ¼ of a tablespoon, or 1/8 of a fluid ounce. This definition of the teaspoon is smaller than the definitions of the teaspoon used today. This is partially due to tea being expensive in 1660s England, resulting in smaller teacups and teaspoons. Once England began importing tea from China in 1710, reducing the cost of tea, the size of teacups and teaspoons increased, and by the 1730s, became 1/3, rather than 1/4 the size of a tablespoon. This is the same size ratio in use today in both the US customary and metric teaspoons (though the actual volumes differ).

The conversion result depends on the standard used in the conversion.Before we determine the number of milliliters present in a teaspoon, it is essential to specify the standard for conversion. For the US teaspoon, one teaspoon is equal to 4.92892159 milliliters. The Metric and Australian teaspoons are equivalent to 5 milliliters. If you are using the UK standard, One teaspoon [UK] is equal to 5.91938802 Milliliters. We use the same method of calculation for other standards if you want to determine the number of milliliters in a single teaspoon. However, their conversion factors will differ depending on the standard you are using in the calculation. (Source: www.calculatorology.com)

 

 

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