FutureStarr

Highbush cranberry alberta

Highbush cranberry alberta

Highbush cranberry alberta

Fruit: Nearly round drupe (drupe: a fleshy fruit with a central stonelike core containing one or more seeds) about 1/3 inch diameter with a single large seed, bright red, juicy and quite acid, like a cranberry. The seeds ripen from August to September. It does not begin to produce fruit until approximately five years of age.

Cranberry

 

Above Photos: Highbush cranberry shrubs in central Maine defoliated by Viburnum leaf beetle larvae. Rightmost image shows four Viburnum leaf beetle larvae feeding on one of the branches. With all of the leaves already consumed, these larvae were feeding on the bark and inner branch layers! Answer: No. Viburnums tend to be self-fruitful. That is, an individual plant’s flowers can pollinate each other, and there is no need for a second type (or even a second individual plant) to provide pollen. And, if you are planting native plants, every one is genetically different from another. In terms of cross-pollination, planting two individual native plants would be the same as planting two hybrids/cultivars. Most of the highbush cranberry viburnums sold in the landscape industry are selections from the wild, or hybrid cultivars that have been developed. These types are valued for their larger fruits, brighter-colored fruits, bolder fall color, dwarf form, etc.

Answer: Yes. Highbush cranberry can be pruned annually. It grows quickly, and in the absence of pruning becomes a rather massive, mounded shrub (they’ve been known to reach 15′ x 15′). If you want to keep it from getting larger than desired, essentially maintaining its present size (assuming it has not yet reached full size), prune each year just after flowering. For pruning guidelines, see the following bulletin and check the information about “heading back” branches (Bulletin #2169).Highbush cranberry (Viburnam trilobum Marsh.) is sometimes confused with the true cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). Highbush Cranberry is a deciduous shrub belonging to the Caprifoliaceae family with an open spreading habit and a height ranging from 6.5 to 13 ft (2 to 4 m). Highbush cranberries are native to Canada with a range from New Brunswick to British Columbia and North to Alaska making it very winter hardy. Highbush Cranberry has not received a lot of attention from breeders but there are some cultivars available with improved fruit characteristics. (Source: www.gov.mb.ca)

 

Related Articles