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Coreopsis Plant

Coreopsis Plant

Coreopsis Plant

Coreopsis plant is an annual and the most common type of coreopsis. It is native to North America and Europe. It has red, white, and yellow flowers that bloom in the summer. Coreopsis plant is commonly used in gardens, where it flowers all summer.Native to North America, coreopsis plants grow in upright clumps and feature masses of bright, showy, daisy-like flowers throughout the summer. The foliage of the species varies, with some varieties boasting large green leaves and others sporting narrower greenery. One of the plant's common names, tickseed, is a nod to its round seeds, which resemble ticks. Birds and other wildlife love to snack on the seeds during the fall and winter, while bees and butterflies are drawn to the colorful blooms.

Coreopsis

Overall, coreopsis plants don’t require much care when grown in their preferred environment. Select a planting site that gets lots of sun and has good soil drainage. Also, don't forget to account for the mature size of your species—when planting, leave some space around each plant for air circulation. The taller coreopsis varieties might need staking as they mature; otherwise, the stems might flop over. Moreover, deadheading your plants (removing the spent blooms) can keep the plant blooming throughout summer and into fall.These plants thrive in well-draining loamy or sandy soil with a fairly neutral soil pH. However, most coreopsis varieties are very easy to grow and aren't particular about soil quality or soil pH, as long as they aren't waterlogged.

New coreopsis plants need regular water to keep the soil evenly moist (but not soggy) until they are established. After their first year, these plants have good drought tolerance, but they'll bloom most prolifically with regular watering. Water deeply whenever the soil is dry about an inch down. Early morning watering is best—it allows the leaves a chance to dry out during the day.Many coreopsis varieties can be grown from seed and often will reseed themselves in your garden. Start seeds indoors six to eight weeks before your area's projected last frost date, or directly plant seeds in your garden after your last frost. Plant the seeds roughly 1/2-inch deep, and keep the soil lightly moist and warm. Seedlings should emerge in about two to three weeks, at which point you can put the seedlings by a sunny window and continue to keep the soil lightly moist. Indoor seedlings will need to be slowly acclimatized to the outdoors by taking them outside for long stretches each day for about a week. Then, they’re ready to be planted in the garden. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

 

 

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