FutureStarr

Black eyed susan leaves

Black eyed susan leaves

Black eyed susan leaves

Versatile, drought-tolerant and easy-to-grow, Black Eyed Susan adds a cheerful splash of color to the summer landscape. A native plant that attracts a variety of pollinators, Black Eyed Susan pairs beautifully with other prairie favorites like Purple Coneflower and Butterfly Weed. Its adapatable nature makes it a great choice for poor soils and tough conditions. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow. Biennial.

Seed

No one knows who Susan was, but the flower is linked with “Sweet William” in an old English rhyme. This species was long thought to be native only to our midwest, spreading to both coasts after colonists and western pioneers felled the forests to allow the highly-prolific seed to spread. But recent research proves Black-Eyed Susan was indeed seen as far east as Maryland in early colonial times. There are many species of rudbeckia, many which have been hybridized into some of our most valued garden perennials. For related perennial species, see R. gloriosa. I have heavily landscaped an acre so I use flowers that self-seed, perennials and bulbs as much as possible. The Susans are the most invasive flowers I have. I sprinkled a lot of seeds about 10 years ago and they quickly covered everything. They even pop up all over the lawn so I spend time pulling some out and planting them along fencelines. Works well as long as they are small. If it wasn’t for them, there would be flowers in some areas so I’m glad they spread.

Black-eyed Susan is an opportunist that thrives easily in disturbed areas. It has naturalized through most of the continent. A biennial, it blooms and completes its life cycle in its second year but will re-seed. We include it as an early marker in almost all of our prairie and savanna seed mixes. For a long-lived perennial Black-eyed Susan, choose Sweet Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia subtomentosa).A Prairie Moon • June 5 Hi Dianna. Interesting question. I have never heard of anyone using this as a cover crop. Most cover crops grow up immediately like Oats or Winter Wheat. Rudbeckia will take longer but it can be very prolific. I’d suggest 16 oz per acre which if spread evenly will give you 33 seeds per square foot. We have noticed that this species does better when planted as part of a mix. It may need some cover from other plants to have the most successful germination. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

Related Articles