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Heliopsis helianthoides

Heliopsis helianthoides

Heliopsis helianthoides

Heliopsis helianthoides is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial growing 40–150 cm (16–59 in) tall. The toothed leaf blades are oval to triangular or lance-shaped and may be smooth or hairy or rough in texture. The flowers are produced from midsummer toearly autumn (fall).

Helianthoides

Heliopsis helianthoides, variously dubbed Early Sunflower, Sweet Smooth Oxeye, False Sunflower and other common names, is a member of the Aster family. Unlike true sunflowers and most asters, both its disk and ray flowers are capable of producing seed. It blooms profusely through the summer on thin stems above the foliage, in the manner of Rudbeckia. Sun-loving, easy to grow, hardy, heat and drought tolerant, False Sunflowers (Heliopsis helianthoides) have plenty of qualities and appeal! Valuable additions to the landscape with their profusion of bright golden daisies (2-3 inches wide, 5-7 cm) on display for 6 to 8 weeks all summer until early fall, they also feature a lovely foliage that is pleasant to the eye. Use them to brighten up a sunny area of the garden or in a vase where they will last a couple of weeks!

Ox Eye Sunflower produces a profusion of bright yellow flowers in early to mid-summer. Excellent for clay soils, it grows in any reasonably fertile soil and thrives in moist, heavy soils. A relative of the sunflowers, Heliopsis helianthoides does not spread by rhizomes, but it will self-sow readily, on open soil. Other common names include Smooth Oxeye, Smooth Sunflower and False Sunflower. As T. R. Fisher (1957) noted, intermediates occur between var. helianthoides and var. scabra, and artificial hybrids show only slightly decreased pollen stainabilities and normal meiotic pairing. Intermediates are especially common in Missouri, Illinois, and New England, and may also be encountered elsewhere in areas of sympatry. In addition to the key characters, var. helianthoides generally has longer petioles, has smaller heads on shorter peduncles, and occupies less-open habitats than var. scabra. (Source: www.efloras.org)

 

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