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Field Garlic

Field Garlic

Field Garlic

Field Garlic is a common lawn weed that, while native to Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, has naturalized in much of the world including the eastern US. It can be found in disturbed areas, along roadsides, thickets, meadows, and woodlands spreading by seeds, aerial bulbils, and bulb offsets below ground. It is a cool-season perennial which means that it emerges in the fall and goes dormant after flowering in the early summer.Leaves, flowers, and bulbs. Use similarly to chives or garlic. However, the plant also has poisonous characteristics as noted in the "Poisonous to Humans" section of this record. Toxicity can depend on the age of the person or animal, the age of the plant, the part of the plant ingested, how much is ingested, whether the person or animal has sensitivities or allergies, whether it's eaten raw or cooked, and so forth. Consult with a medical professional for further details.

Garlic

Many Americans can’t stand the sight or smell of them and spray them with herbicides. There’s absolutely no reason for most homeowners to do this. They’re free food! However, if you raise livestock, wild garlic can give meat and eggs a garlicky flavor you may not want. But herbicides don’t work particularly well against wild garlic, so you’re best off prying the bulbs out of the ground.The central stem terminates in a long naked stalk of flowers and/or aerial bulblets. Usually, a sessile cluster of aerial bulblets is produced; a few flowers on slender pedicels may appear above the bulbets. On rare occasions, an umbel of flowers will develop without bulblets. Regardless of whether flowers or bulblets are produced, the mature inflorescence is about about 2-3" across.

During an early stage of development, the entire inflorescence is covered by a sack-like membrane that is rounded at the bottom and pointed at the top. This membrane splits open to release the bulbets and/or flowers. A dried remnant of this membrane usually persists at the base of the inflorescence. The bulblets are green to dark red, about 1/3" (8 mm.) long, and ovoid. Each bulblet has a long green tail that is about 1" long. The small flowers are green, white, or light purple. Each flower is about �" long, consisting of 6 tepals that are erect or slightly spreading. The blooming period can occur from late spring to mid-summer and lasts about 2-3 weeks. While the flowers are not noticeably fragrant, the foliage has a strong garlic aroma. Each flower is replaced by a 3-celled capsule containing several small black seeds. The root system consists of a bulb with secondary roots. Bulblets are often formed underground as offsets of the mother plant. This plant usually reproduces (Source:www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

 

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