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Coneflower

Coneflower

Coneflower

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Coneflower

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Bright, upright plants, coneflowers are a North American perennial in the Daisy family (Asteraceae). Specifically, the plant is native to the eastern United States, from Iowa and Ohio south to Louisiana and Georgia. They grow 2 to 4 feet in height with dark green foliage. They are fast growers and self-sow their seeds profusely. These midsummer bloomers can flower from midsummer through fall frost! Echinacea /ˌɛkɪˈneɪʃiÉ™/ is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants in the daisy family. It has ten species, which are commonly called coneflowers. They are found only in eastern and central North America, where they grow in moist to dry prairies and open wooded areas. They have large, showy heads of composite flowers, blooming in summer. The generic name is derived from the Greek word ἐχá¿–νος (ekhinos), meaning "sea urchin", due to the spiny central disk. These flowering plants and their parts have different uses. Some species are cultivated in gardens for their showy flowers. Two of the species, E. tennesseensis and E. laevigata, are listed in the United States as endangered species. To create an ideal environment for coneflower roots to grow strong, improve your native in-ground soil by mixing 3 inches of Miracle-Gro® Garden Soil for Flowers in with the top 6 inches of existing soil.

This rich, nutrient-filled garden soil has Moisture Control® technology, which helps protect plants during those times when they accidentally get too much—or too little—water. Plus, when you use Miracle-Gro® soil and plant food (and follow all the directions), you’ll get up to triple the flowers over the growing season (vs. unfed)—so be sure to check out the "How to Feed Coneflowers" section below. Just planting one coneflower? Dig a hole and blend garden soil with the soil you just dug up in a 50:50 ratio. Try this easy pruning trick to enjoy coneflower blooms even longer on plants you’ve had for at least a season. Once they’ve begun to grow again in the spring, cut some of the stems back by half to delay flowering on those stems. The uncut stems will produce blooms first, then the cut stems will add their beauty a little later in the season.Purple Coneflower, Echinacea purpurea, is one of the many different species of coneflowers readily available at local nurseries and garden centers. It is a herbaceous perennial, meaning that it comes back from the roots every year. Coneflower leaves are dark green, oval shaped with serrate or toothed margins and they become smaller and more lanceolate shaped at the top of the plant. The leaves are coarse in texture. The plants grow up to 3 feet tall and wide. The flowers on a purple coneflower are a purple aster or daisy type of flower with an orange center. The flowers bloom throughout the summer into late summer. It requires several growing seasons for yellow coneflower to reach its full size. Most plants do not bloom until their second or third year from seed, and it generally takes about 5 years before you get a good flower show. Because it develops a tap root, put in a permanent location when young or transplant when dormant in the early spring or late fall. Use yellow coneflower individually in the border or as a mass planting. Because it has an open habit, it is best to plant this species in groups of 3 or more in the garden to increase the visual impact. Try combining it with bright red or purple bee balm (Monarda), Teucrium ‘Purple Tails’, or blue-flowering catmint (Nepeta). Plant in front of tall ornamental grasses, such as little bluestem (Schizacryium scoparium) or ‘Karl Foerster’ feather reed grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora). (Source: hort.extension.wisc.edu)

 

 

 

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