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Symptoms of a kidney stone

Symptoms of a kidney stone

Symptoms of a kidney stone

When falls through a ruptured kidney stone gene it can cause pain, blood-stained urine and vomiting. After the removal of a kidney stone, there can be vomiting, ataxia, and mental confusion.

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A stone in your kidney is an irregularly-shaped solid mass or crystal that can be as small as a grain of sand up to the size of a golf ball. Depending on the size of your kidney stone (or stones), you may not even realize that you have one. Even small stones can cause extreme pain as they exit your body through your urinary tract. Drinking fluids may help the process, which can take as long as three weeks. Pain in your back or side, blood in your urine and nausea/vomiting alongside the pain are symptoms of a kidney stone or stones. Most kidney stones are about the size of a chickpea, but they can also be as small as a grain of sand and as large as a golf ball. Small stones can pass through your urinary tract but you might need surgery for the larger ones.

Kidney stones are formed from substances in your urine. The substances that combine into stones normally pass through your urinary system. When they don’t, it’s because there isn’t enough urine volume, causing the substances to become highly concentrated and to crystalize. This is typically a result of not drinking enough water. The stone-forming substances are: Ureteroscopy: To perform this procedure, a small instrument called an ureteroscope is inserted in your urethra, through your bladder and into a ureter. This instrument shows the kidney stones and then retrieves them in a surgical “basket,” or breaks them apart using a laser. These smaller pieces of the kidney stones are then easily able to exit your body through your urinary tract. (Source: my.clevelandclinic.org)

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Possible causes include drinking too little water, exercise (too much or too little), obesity, weight loss surgery, or eating food with too much salt or sugar. Infections and family history might be important in some people. Eating too much fructose correlates with increasing risk of developing a kidney stone. Fructose can be found in table sugar and high fructose corn syrup.

See a doctor as soon as possible. You may be asked to drink extra fluid in an attempt to flush out the stone out in the urine. If you strain your urine and can save a piece of the stone that has passed, bring it to your doctor. Or, the stone may need to be removed with surgery. (Source: www.kidney.org)

 

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