FutureStarr

Scott Bakula

Scott Bakula

Scott Bakula

Scott Bakula

Scott Bakula was born on 5 January 1955 in Long Island, New York. He grew up in Gulfport, Mississippi. He attended the University of North Carolina School of the Arts for one year before beginning his career performing in night comedy clubs in New York City, where he became known as a member of the "New Faces" comedy revue. It was an audition on the recommendation of John Belushi that led to him getting a part in the cast of the TV sitcom "Wings".

Leap

Bakula starred in the musical Shenandoah, a play which also provided his first professional theatrical role in 1976, at Ford's Theatre, in 2006. Bakula is heard singing "Pig Island" on Sandra Boynton's children's CD Philadelphia Chickens, which is labeled as being "For all ages except 43." Scott Bakula said that he might be starring as Sam in a Quantum Leap film as stated in TV Guide Magazine along with Dean Stockwell. At Comic Con 2010, he announced that a script was being worked on and that while he would be in the movie, he would not have the main role.

Scott Stewart Bakula was born on October 9, 1954 in St. Louis, Missouri, to Sally (Zumwinkel) and J. Stewart Bakula, a lawyer. He is of German, as well as Czech, Austrian, Scottish and English ancestry. He comes from a musical family. In the fourth grade, he started a rock band and wrote songs for them, he later sang with the St. Louis Symphony. He studied Law at the University of Kansas until his sophomore year when he left to pursue acting. In 1976, he was first hired professionally in the role of Sam in "Shenandoah" and went to New York. After several small roles on television, he starred opposite Dean Stockwell in the science fiction series Quantum Leap (1989). Bakula played Dr. Sam Beckett, a physicist who was trapped by a malfunction of his time machine to correct things gone wrong in the past. He won a Golden Globe in 1992 for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV series - Drama for Quantum Leap (1989) and was nominated for a Tony Award in 1988. He also starred in the prequel series Enterprise (2001) as Jonathan Archer, the captain of Earth's first long-range starship. Today, he lives in Los Angeles, California and has a farm in upstate New York. (Source: www.imdb.com)

Actor

Scott Stewart Bakula was born on October 9, 1954 in St. Louis, Missouri, to Sally (Zumwinkel) and J. Stewart Bakula, a lawyer. He is of German, as well as Czech, Austrian, Scottish and English ancestry. He comes from a musical family. In the fourth grade, he started a rock band and wrote songs for them, he later sang with the St. Louis Symphony. He studied Law at the University of Kansas until his sophomore year when he left to pursue acting. In 1976, he was first hired professionally in the role of Sam in "Shenandoah" and went to New York. After several small roles on television, he starred opposite Dean Stockwell in the science fiction series Quantum Leap (1989). Bakula played Dr. Sam Beckett, a physicist who was trapped by a malfunction of his time machine to correct things gone wrong in the past. He won a Golden Globe in 1992 for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV series - Drama for Quantum Leap (1989) and was nominated for a Tony Award in 1988. He also starred in the prequel series Enterprise (2001) as Jonathan Archer, the captain of Earth's first long-range starship. Today, he lives in Los Angeles, California and has a farm in upstate New York.

[on Enterprise (2001)] Oh, it was a fantastic experience. I had a ball. We had some fantastically talented people on all sides of the camera. We had great actors, tremendously creative effects people and set people and makeup people and... It was fantastic. You were working with some of the most talented people and groundbreakers in the industry, and I got to do it for four years. (Source:

Treak

On how he got the role of Captain Jonathan Archer: Kerry McCluggage and Garry Hart were both at Universal when I did Quantum Leap (1989). We had a long and very good relationship. My production company was already at Paramount when they approached me. I was excited, but wanted to meet Rick Berman and Brannon Braga and read the pilot script. Once I read that and met with the guys it was kind of a no-brainer in terms of a role to play, a place to work, with great collaborators, and it would keep me at home for the next few years. (September/October 2006, Star Trek Magazine issue #1)

On the best thing about playing a Star Trek captain: I was very excited. I was a huge fan of the original Star Trek, and I'd never even dreamed that I would someday be captain of a starship... I'm a big fan of the future of space programs on this planet, especially if it's a space program that can proceed in a peaceful fashion, keeping weapons out of space. (September/October 2006, Star Trek Magazine issue #1) (Source: www.imdb.com)

 

 

Related Articles