FutureStarr

Field Violet State Flower

Field Violet State Flower

Field Violet State Flower

Field Pansies are annual to perennial flowers (depending on winter temperatures) in the Violaceae family. Although their origin is Europe, Western Asia and North Africa, they have become introduced and naturalized in the United States. They have showy two-toned fragrant flowers that appear from April to June. If blooming slows with warm summer weather prune back to encourage a second bloom in the fall.

Flower

Stems, leaves or both with some degree of hairiness. Violet flowers have 5 petals, with the lower 3 usually larger: The lowest petal forms a spur containing nectar, and the 2 side petals have a tuft of hairs on the inner side. The color of this species is variable: Some forms have violet flowers; some have all-white flowers with purple veins on the lower petal. A third form, sometimes called the "Confederate violet," has grayish-white petals with violet or blue veins and more solid patches of these colors on the inner portion of the petals, forming a broad, U-shaped eyespot. Blooms March–June, and sporadically into early fall. Leaves are heart-shaped or rounded, scalloped, usually lower than the flowers.We present a list of the 50 states and their flowers; for more information, visit The United States National Arboretum. Since ancient times, civic leaders have used flowers and flower images as symbols of thriving communities. In fact, you might say flowers were an early form of advertising. And while there's no shortage of commercials in modern America, we still tap flowers for their unparalleled prowess in communication, with each state in the union proudly claiming an official state flower.

This is a herbaceous perennial plant with the leaves and flowers emerging directly from the rhizomes, and forming a basal rosette. A typical mature plant may be 6" across and 4" high, with the flowers slightly higher than the leaves. The leaves are individually up to 3" long and 3" across (excluding the long petioles), and vary in color from yellowish green to dark green, depending on growing conditions. They are oval-ovate to orbicular-cordate in shape, and crenate or serrate along the margins. Different populations of plants can vary in the hairiness of their leaves – from nearly glabrous to conspicuously hairy or pubescent. The flowers are about �" across, and consist of 5 rounded petals. There are 2 upper petals, 2 lateral petals with white hairs (or beards) near the throat of the flower, and a lower petal that functions as a landing pad for visiting insects. The flowers of this form of Viola sororia are medium to dark violet. The inner throat of each flower is more or less white, from which slightly darker veins radiate outward along the petals (particularly the lower one). There is no noticeable floral scent. The blooming period occurs from mid- to late spring, and lasts about 1-1� months. During the summer, cleistogamous flowers without petals produce seeds, which are flung outward by mechanical ejection from the three-parted seed capsules. The root system consists of thick, horizontally branched rhizomes; there is a tendency to form vegetative colonies. (Source: www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

 

Related Articles