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California Bulrushor

California Bulrushor

California Bulrush

California Bulrush (Schoenoplectus californicus) is a native perennial herb in the Cyperaceae (Sedge) family that grows in northern, southern and central California. It is also found in Oregon and across the southern states to Florida. It is a definitive species of freshwater or brackish marshes, found in perennially inundated areas such as lakes and ponds, but generally not in flowing water. It tolerates standing water several feet deep where it creates sometimes massive patches. It occurs at elevations from sea level to 4,000 feet, often but not always near the coast. It is an aggressive spreader from its rhizomes and will

Bulrush

Although it will tolerate some salinity, most of the bulrush in the Reserve is found east of Interstate 5 where the ocean influence is muted. Large stands are visible from the East Basin trails, often mixed with southern cattails (Typha latifolia). Bulrush is also found in Central Basin in areas that receive consistent runoff from surrounding communities – along the Pole Road and east of the Nature Center boardwalk.Schoenoplectus californicus (California Bulrush) is a species of perennial grass in the family sedges. They have a self-supporting growth form. They are associated with freshwater habitat. They are native to Western North America, Eastern North America, Pampa, SãO Paulo, Paraná, Santa Catarina, Sergipe, Rio De Janeiro, Mata Atlântica, Bahia, Rio Grande Do Sul, Espirito Santo, and The Contiguous United States. They have simple, broad leaves and brown flowers. Individuals can grow to 6.6 feet.

Schoenoplectus californicus (California Bulrush) is a species of perennial grass in the family sedges. They have a self-supporting growth form. They are associated with freshwater habitat. They are native to Western North America, Eastern North America, Pampa, SãO Paulo, Paraná, Santa Catarina, Sergipe, Rio De Janeiro, Mata Atlântica, Bahia, Rio Grande Do Sul, Espirito Santo, and The Contiguous United States. They have simple, broad leaves and brown flowers. Individuals can grow to 6.6 feet.Submerged portions of all aquatic plants provide habitats for many micro and macro invertebrates. These invertebrates in turn are used as food by fish and other wildlife species (e.g. amphibians, reptiles, ducks, etc.). After aquatic plants die, their decomposition by bacteria and fungi provides food (called “detritus”) for many aquatic invertebrates. Seeds of bulrushes are consumed by ducks and other birds; while geese, muskrats, and nutria consume the rhizomes and early shoots. (Source: aquaplant.tamu.edu)

 

 

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