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Wild Plants

Wild Plants

Wild Plants

Wild plants are often more valuable than cultivated plants, but they have to be managed correctly before you can benefit from them. We’ll take a look at some common mistakes made in the management of wild plants, and how you can avoid them.Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires administered to 240 respondents living in and around eight forest reserves between November 2017 and May 2018. One focus group discussion (8–12 members) per forest reserve and field excursions to collect the plant voucher specimens were also conducted. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, relative frequency of citation (RFC), and the factor of informants’ consensus (FIC).

Plant

The consumption of wild edible plants is an ancient phenomenon which predates agriculture [1]. These plants offer various benefits and opportunities to communities; for example, they enable communities to cope with food scarcity [2,3,4]. This is also known as ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) [5]. They hold great cultural significance to dependent communities [6]. In addition, wild edible plants increase the nutritional quality of rural diets for instance, micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) which are sometimes superior to those of domesticated varieties [7]. Some of them also contain genes that can be sought to improve the productivity of cultivars [8]. They also contribute to household incomes [9], thereby contributing to the attainment of sustainable development goal 1 on eradicating poverty.

In as much as intensification of agriculture and biotechnology can offer remedies to food scarcity, the role of wild edible plants cannot be under estimated [14]. They have been reported to make a significant proportion to the global food basket [16]. For instance, in 2014, it was estimated that approximately one billion people globally use wild food plants to supplement their diets [17]. Indeed, in most African communities, the tradition of gathering and consuming wild food plants still persists [9, 15] despite reliance on a few staple crops and huge investments in agriculture [18]. Therefore, it is urgent to recognize the contribution of these plants to food and nutritional security in communities that still use them. (Source: ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com)

 

 

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