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Wild ginger plant hawaii

Wild ginger plant hawaii

Wild ginger plant hawaii

Most varieties of wild ginger are old hardy to Zone 4, so they should overwinter just fine in most temperate regions. They do need cold winter temperatures to complete their life cycle, so they won't really flourish in zones warmer than 7. Wild ginger likes moist soil and so will tolerate humidity fairly well.

Ginger

Asarum canadense, wild ginger, is found throughout the eastern half of the United States. It grows in rich mesic soils in shady deciduous forests. Many a hiker has walked past the large colonies of this early spring wildflower not realizing that it has an interesting and peculiar flower underneath the canopy of its heart-shaped leaves. The plants are softly pubescent especially the leaf petiole and the flower. Wild ginger’s flower is located at the base of the plant lying adjacent to the ground. The flowers are bell shaped with three acuminate-reflexed tips. The flower is brownish purple inside. Some folks liken the flower to a little knocked over jug on the ground.The ants deliver the seed back to their colony where they will eat the fleshy nodules and discard the actual seed, which is then left to grow in the nutrient-rich plant waste underground. While it is not to be confused with the more common type of ginger that is used to season food, there are still some recipes that call for using wild ginger as a spice substitute.

Canadian wild ginger, or snakeroot (A. canadense), grows about 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 inches) tall in shady woods in eastern North America. It usually bears two heart-shaped, downy leaves and a single inconspicuous cup-shaped flower. The flower develops in the angle between two leafstalks at the surface of the ground and has three reddish brown lobes. This plant is a useful but coarse ground cover. Although wild gingers, Asarum and Hexastylis species, can be found the world over, most of the ones that are cultivated for their ornamental value are native to the shaded woodlands of Asia and North America. Wild ginger does not refer to the culinary ginger (Zingiber officinale) that is used in stir-fry and ginger ale. However, its fleshy root does have a spicy aroma and can be substituted for culinary ginger in your favorite Asian recipe. The number of species and cultivars offers gardeners a wide choice of leaf patterns and color for use in a shade garden. These perennials are a versatile, easy-to-grow choice for the woodland shade garden as a groundcover or massed planting with outstanding foliage interest. (Source: hgic.clemson.edu)

 

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