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Twinleaf

Twinleaf

Twinleaf

You should think about your website, campaign, and content as an ecosystem. Any change to the complexity of your website will affect the health of your marketing efforts, and any change in the health of your marketing efforts will certainly have an impact on your website and campaign. This is where our software comes in.Each large, blue-green leaf has two deeply divided symmetrical lobes, somewhat like a butterfly with its wings spread open, which gives rise to its common name of twinleaf. The leaves may be coarsely toothed or wavy around the edges. The foliage is only about 6-8 inches tall when the flowers open before or as the leaves expand. The clumps of plants later grow up to 18 inches tall, forming a mound of foliage through early to mid- summer before senescing and disappearing for the remainder of the year.

Twinleaf

Twinleaf has one white flower atop a leafless stalk appearing in April-May. The flower is about 2.5 cm wide (1 inch), with four sepals that eventually drop off, and eight petals. The fruit that follows is a large, dry, pear-shaped capsule, with a tiny-hinged lid. Its leaves can be up to 15 cm long (6 inches), and are basal, long-stemmed, and divided lengthwise into wing-like halves. This is a very distinctive characteristic. The plant is short while flowering and fruiting (12.5 to 25 cm; 5-10 inches) and increases to 45 cm (1.5 feet) as the fruit mature.the flower resembles bloodroot flowers. The short-lived flower appears in April or May before the forest canopy appears (see spring ephemeral). The fruit is a green pear-shaped capsule with a hinged top. The characteristic leaves are large and nearly divided in half, giving rise to its common name, twinleaf. It rarely grows taller than 12 inches (30 cm). As with other deciduous forest plants, the seeds are dispersed by ants, a process known as myrmecochory.

The solitary flower somewhat resembles that of Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis), but the latter species has palmately compound leaves with 5-9 lobes. Although both common and species names suggest a plant with two leaves, there are actually more; each leaf is divided into two nearly separate leaflets. The genus was named in honor of Thomas Jefferson by his friend and fellow botanist William Bartram. Only one other species of twinleaf occurs in the world: J. dubia, found in Japan. Twinleaf is a Special Concern species in both Minnesota and Wisconsin; Minnesota is on the northwest fringe of its range and this species is only found in our most southeastern counties. According to the DNR, much of its forest habitat has succumbed to agriculture and development and it now faces additional threats from non-native invasive species. Twinleaf flowers look very similar to Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis), which has distinctly different leaves that are larger, more round in outline, and lobed in 3 to 9 parts. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

 

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