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Steeplebush

Steeplebush

Steeplebush

Steeplebush is a nonprofit organization dedicated to collaboration, conversation and conversation skills.A similar species, the pink-flowered Japanese Spiraea (S. japonica) from Asia, differs from Steeplebush in having flat-topped clusters of flowers and smooth leaves; since its introduction into North America, it has invaded a broad area, from Ontario and Michigan east to Maine and south to Georgia, Tennessee, and Illinois.Pink spikes of flowers mid to late summer make Steeplebush a popular species. A mound-shaped form with unbranched stems, bright pink flowers, orangeish-red bark, and yellow fall foliage make this a shrub with year-round interest for the landscape. It grows best in moist acidic soils in full sun. Slow rhizomatous roots help this beautiful plant to spread.

Steeplebush

Steeplebush usually blooms in the Adirondack region in late summer, depending on the weather. A tally of flowering dates for the upland Adirondack areas compiled by Michael Kudish, based on data collected from the early seventies to the early nineties, lists the flowering times from 2 August to 21 August. The pattern of Adirondack Park iNaturalist observations suggests a somewhat expanded bloom time in more recent years, from late July to late August.Spiraea tomentosa (Steeplebush) is a suckering deciduous shrub bearing erect, unbranched stems clad with elliptic to ovate, medium to dark green leaves, 3 in. long (7 cm), densely hairy beneath. The foliage turns golden-yellow in fall. In mid summer to early fall, dense plumes, 4-8 in. long (10-20 cm), packed with tiny pink to rose-purple flowers, appear at the tips of the branches. Blooming from top to bottom, the flowers produce nectar and pollen, which attract bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects.

Typically found in the wild in wet prairies and along edges of streams, marshes or bogs, Steeplebush is most suitable for naturalistic landscaping. It also does well in cottage gardens where it can grow in full sun yet have its feet wet or moist.Spiraea tomentosa, or Steeplebush, is an upright, multi-stemmed, suckering, deciduous shrub that can grow to 4 feet high with a slightly larger width. It is native to wet meadows, wet pastures, boggy areas, marshes, fields, and lake margins from Nova Scotia south to Louisiana and Georgia. As it's native location suggests, the plant needs moist acidic soils in order to grow well. This trait makes it a good selection for moist locations in the landscape or as a low hedge for paths and walkways. This is a flowering shrub with tiny pink to rose to rose-purple flowers clustered, top to bottom, on 4 to 8 inch terminal spikes that bloom from mid-summer to early autumn. These flowers attract butterflies. (Source: plants.ces.ncsu.edu)

 

 

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