FutureStarr

Silky Dogwood Shrubor

Silky Dogwood Shrubor

Silky Dogwood Shrub

Species questions: There are 2 species that are very similar and the common name Silky Dogwood has been applied to both. C. obliqua is one and the second is C. amomum. The U of M Herbarium once stated that name is misapplied and the species in collections is C. obliqua, Pale Dogwood. The Minnesota DNR 2019 species census list contains only Pale Dogwood, C. obliqua, and does not list C. amomum. Eloise Butler also used C. amomum when she first planted it. The details between the two species differences are in the leaf structure and the type of hair. The leaves of the Garden plants fit more closely the key for C. obliqua.

Silky Dogwood

Maypop (P. incarnata), a common species in the southeastern US. This is a subtropical representative of this mostly tropical family. However, unlike the more tropical cousins, this particular species is hardy enough to withstand the cold down to −20 °C (−4 °F) before its roots die (it is native as far north as Pennsylvania and has been cultivated as far north as Boston and Chicago.) The fruit is sweet, yellowish, and roughly the size of a chicken's egg; it enjoys some popularity as a native plant with edible fruit and few pests.Flowering dogwood (C. florida) prefers well-drained, acid-based soils and most common in the Ozarks. It is identified by its combination of opposite leaves, dense flowerheads with 4 showy bracts beneath the yellowish clusters of inconspicuous flowers, and oval red fruits. It is Missouri’s official state tree, producing lovely boughs of white inflorescences (flower clusters) in our springtime forests.

White lupin is highly susceptible to anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides or C. acutatum), a common seed-borne disease in countries with humid summers. Anthracnose spreads rapidly by wind, rain, soil-borne spores, clothing and equipment. It can cause almost total crop loss when the infection is severe and left untreated. However, anthracnose is easy to detect and can be efficiently controlled with fungicide applications (PGRO, 2014). Species questions: There are 2 species that are very similar and the common name Silky Dogwood has been applied to both. C. obliqua is one and the second is C. amomum. The U of M Herbarium once stated that name is misapplied and the species in collections is C. obliqua, Pale Dogwood. The Minnesota DNR 2019 species census list contains only Pale Dogwood, C. obliqua, and does not list C. amomum. Eloise Butler also used C. amomum when she first planted it. The details between the two species differences are in the leaf structure and the type of hair. The leaves of the Garden plants fit more closely the key for C. obliqua. (Source: www.friendsofthewildflowergarden.org)

 

Related Articles