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Rugosa

Rugosa

Rugosa

Rugosa is a rug and textile design studio specializing in modern and contemporary woven rugs from the Andalusian region of Spain. We design and weave the perfect carpet for any space, inspired by the simplicity of modernism.Rosa rugosa is a suckering shrub which develops new plants from the roots and forms dense thickets 1–1.50 m tall with stems densely covered in numerous short, straight prickles 3–10 mm long. The leaves are 8–15 cm long, pinnate with 5–9 leaflets, most often 7, each leaflet 3–4 cm long, with a distinctly corrugated (rugose, hence the species' name) surface. The leaf is elliptical in shape with a rounded base or broadly cuneate with a leather feel, dark green top. The back of the leaf is composed of a green-grey colour with hair along the veins. The leaf margin is composed of teeth along the edges and is crenate-serrate. The flower has five petals that are usually 6-9 cm in width. The flower is composed of 200-250 stamens per flow and vary in style.

Rugosa

This was the first presence of the flower within the European continent. In 1875, Rosa rugosa was found in Denmark and then in Sweden in 1918. By 2001, the flower species had become well established within 61 European countries. Although it is native within China, it has been labeled as an endangered species due to a noticeable high decline in population rates of the flower.Rugosas are known as rugged roses because they can be virtually maintenance-free. They can handle less-than-ideal growing conditions, including light shade, salt air, frigid temperatures, drought, and high humidity. The Latin name rugosa means "wrinkled" and refers specifically to the crinkled, serrated leaves with pronounced veins. Rugosa rose leaves occur in leaflets of five to seven leaves. Species plants often had single flowers (a circle of petals with a center disk), but double flowers have been hybridized and tend to be only about 2 to 3 inches wide. Many have a slight to strong clove fragrance. How much to prune rugosa roses depends on how large you want them to be.

To encourage new growth and keep the plant full, it helps to prune at least 3 to 10 inches from the tips in spring. As with all roses, don’t prune if a frost is anticipated within six weeks, to prevent winter dieback.Flowers usually solitary or few together, 6–9 cm across, fragrant, nectarless. Sepals 2–3 cm, entire, with a broad, expanded tip, appressedly pubescent, aciculate and glandular (sometimes with stipitate glands), erect on the hip, persistent. Petals five, bright purplish-pink, sometimes white (R. rugosa f. alba (Ware) Rehder). Stamens 200–250 per flower, and styles often more than hundred. Styles pilose; stigmas in a large, domed head, sunk in the narrow, concave disc; disc 2.5–4 mm across; orifice large, at least half the diameter of the disc. A hypanthium (hip) encloses the achenes. It is depressed globose, 1.5–2 cm long and 2–2.5 cm wide, with a distinct neck below the sepals, dull green to orange when unripe, becoming glossy and brilliant red when ripe, most often smooth. Pedicel of the same length as the hip, tomentose, often with gland-tipped acicles, erect in flower, curved in fruit so that the hip points downwards. (Source: www.cabi.org)

 

 

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