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Rudbeckia Perennialor

Rudbeckia Perennialor

Rudbeckia Perennial

Rudbeckia laciniata, the tall coneflower, cut leaf coneflower, or green-headed coneflower, is one of the tallest Rudbeckias. Topping out between three and twelve feet, cut leaf coneflower has divided leaves and four-inch wide flowers that have green, cone-shaped centers and yellow, downward curved petals. It is native to nearly all of North America. I grow mine in the back of my perennial border where it can stand watch over all the other plants I hTry easy-to-grow salads such as radish, spring onion and salad bowl lettuce. You can also use this technique to grow flowering perennials and biennials as well as hardy annuals to brighten up you beds and borders. Sow into weed-free soil that has been dug, forked and raked to create a fine surface structure or ’tilth’

Perennial

Rudbeckia laciniata, the tall coneflower, cut leaf coneflower, or green-headed coneflower, is one of the tallest Rudbeckias. Topping out between three and twelve feet, cut leaf coneflower has divided leaves and four-inch wide flowers that have green, cone-shaped centers and yellow, downward curved petals. It is native to nearly all of North America. I grow mine in the back of my perennial border where it can stand watch over all the other plants I have growing there. Rudbeckia triloba, brown-eyed Susans or thin-leaved coneflowers, are an eastern and southern species. Of all the Rudbeckias, triloba is my absolute favorite. The basal leaves of this plant are often trifoliate (meaning they are comprised of three leaflets joined together). The plants are multi-branched and reach two to three feet in height, lending a dense, bushy appearance to the plant. Each flower measures an inch or so across, and the entire plant is completely smothered in flowers by late summer. Though R. triloba is considered a short lived perennial in most areas, it is totally worth growing. I will not garden without it!

Among the best border perennials available, this is a selection of one of our native North American wildflowers. Plants make a bushy, upright clump with a profuse display of brown-eyed, golden-orange daisies from midsummer through the fall. Seedheads have good winter interest. A terrific choice for mass planting, combining especially well with ornamental grasses. Excellent for cutting. Removing faded flowers regularly will greatly increase the blooming time. Plants may be easily divided in early spring. Attractive to butterflies. A former Perennial Plant of the Year in 1999. Among the best border perennials available, this is a selection of one of our native North American wildflowers. Plants make a bushy, upright clump with a profuse display of brown-eyed, golden-orange daisies from midsummer through the fall. Seedheads have good winter interest. A terrific choice for mass planting, combining especially well with ornamental grasses. Excellent for cutting. Removing faded flowers regularly will greatly increase the blooming time. Plants may be easily divided in early spring. Attractive to butterflies. A former Perennial Plant of the Year in 1999. (Source: www.perennials.com)

 

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