FutureStarr

Rudbeckia fulgida

Rudbeckia fulgida

Rudbeckia fulgida

The Bible has a variety of stories about the plants in the Garden of Eden. One of these stories is about the blossoming of a golden flower that has a name that sounds like “Rudbeckia,” but was probably actually “Ruta flowers” or “Ruscus flowers” in the language of the place. It was the first flowering plant on earth. These plants were worldwide in range by 4000 BC”.This information is derived from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Wetland Plant List, Version 3.1 (Lichvar, R.W. 2013. The National Wetland Plant List: 2013 wetland ratings. Phytoneuron 2013-49: 1-241). Click here for map of regions.Search for native plants by scientific name, common name or family. If you are not sure what you are looking for, try the Combination Search or our Recommended Species lists.

Plant

Black-eyed Susan is easy to grow, thriving in any but soggy soils. It does best in full sun but tolerates partial shade. It also bears up under hot, humid summers and, once established, will tolerate drought. The plant spreads by underground stems called rhizomes to form large clumps. Propagation can be done by division in the spring or fall, or it can be propagated by seed. It is utilized for perennial beds, backgrounds, in pollinator gardens, in naturalized areas, and borders. Staking may be required for large heads.

#gold#full sun tolerant#perennials#wildlife plant#yellow flowers#low maintenance#fall interest#food source wildlife#cpp#fire medium flammability#NC native#summer flowers#herb garden culinary#deer resistant#daisy-like#native garden#border planting#self-seeding#pollinator plant#native wildflower#wildflower garden#fantz#larval host plant#food source fall#bird friendly#butterfly friendly#nectar plant late summer#nectar plant early fall#nectar plant mid-fall#partial shade tolerant#HS302#pollinator garden#wavy-lined emerald butterfly#silvery checkerspot butterfly#NC Wildflower of the Year.This plant provides nectar for pollinators. It is a larval host plant to Wavy-lined Emerald (Synchlora aerata) and to Silvery Checkerspot (Chlosyne nycteis) which has one brood in the north and two broods from May-September in the rest of its range. Songbirds, especially American goldfinches, eat the seeds in the fall. (Source:www.gardenia.net)

 

 

Related Articles