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Rivers of Georgia

Rivers of Georgia

Georgia Rivers

Georgia Rivers

Georgia Rivers

Georgia Rivers is a creative, multimedia company that makes the world a more colorful place with stunning photography, custom artwork, and bespoke design services.

River

Georgia has 70,150 miles of rivers and streams that wind their way across the state. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that Georgia has 44,056 miles of perennial streams, 23,906 miles of intermittent streams, and 603 miles of ditches and canals. Georgia has 4.8 million acres of wetlands, 425,382 acres of public lakes and reservoirs, 854 square miles of estuaries, and 100 miles of coastline.

Georgia has about 25,000 rivers, many of which power small hydroelectric stations. Drainage is into the Black Sea to the west and through Azerbaijan to the Caspian Sea to the east. The largest river is the Kura River, which flows 1,364 km from northeast Turkey across the plains of eastern Georgia, through the capital, Tbilisi, and into the Caspian Sea. The Rioni River, the largest river in western Georgia, rises in the Greater Caucasus and empties into the Black Sea at the port of Poti. Soviet engineers turned the river lowlands along the Black Sea coast into prime subtropical agricultural land, embanked and straightened many stretches of river, and built an extensive system of canals. Deep mountain gorges form topographical belts within the Greater Caucasus. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

State

The fourteen river basins of Georgia are the Altamaha, Chattahoochee, Coosa, Flint, Ochlockonee, Ocmulgee, Oconee, Ogeechee, Satilla, Savannah, Suwanee, St. Marys, Tallapoosa, and Tennessee. The Savannah River, which begins at the confluence of the Seneca and Tugaloo rivers in the northeast part of the state, forms the border between Georgia and South Carolina. It empties into the Atlantic Ocean near Savannah. The Tennessee River, part of the northwestern Coosa and Tallapoosa river basins, flows northward and enters the Mississippi River via the Ohio River. Both the Coosa River, which begins in the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the Tallapoosa River, which begins in the Piedmont, flow into the Mobile River basin in Alabama. Farther south, the Chattahoochee and Flint river basins include the highly urbanized Atlanta metropolitan area; these rivers eventually merge and empty into the Gulf of Mexico. In central Georgia, the Oconee and Ocmulgee rivers merge to form the Altamaha River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean. Three of the five blackwater rivers in Georgia’s coastal plain, the Ogeechee, Satilla, and St. Marys rivers, drain to the Atlantic Ocean, while the remaining two, the Suwanee and Ochlockonee, are Gulf Coast drainages.

Georgia has a vast diversity of surface and groundwater resources. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that Georgia has 44,056 miles of perennial streams, 23,906 miles of intermittent streams, and 603 miles of ditches and canals. Georgia has 4.8 million acres of wetlands, 425,382 acres of public lakes and reservoirs, 854 square miles of estuaries, and 100 miles of coastline. In the forty-eight contiguous states, there are only forty-two free-flowing rivers greater than 200 kilometers in length, and Georgia contains five such rivers: the Flint, Ogeechee, Satilla, St. Marys, and Suwannee. (Source: www.georgiaencyclopedia.org)

 

 

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