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Reed plant

Reed plant

Reed plant

I wanted to plant some flowers this month and I had no idea which type of flowers to choose, so I did a quick search online and found this plant guide. It looked like just the thing, so I bought a replacement and planted it in my flowerbed. I'm happy to say that my flowers are flourishing, thanks to this guide.common, or water, reed (Phragmites australis) occurs along the margins of lakes, fens, marshes, and streams from the Arctic to the tropics. It is a broad-leafed grass, about 1.5 to 5 metres (5 to 16.5 feet) tall, with feathery flower clusters and stiff, smooth stems. Other plants of the.cosmopolitan species Phragmites australis, the giant reed grass, has the widest geographic range of any flowering plant. This remarkably versatile species extends north to south in a wide band around the Earth between latitudes 70° N and 40° S and is most abundant in the Old World temperate regions; it.Phragmites australis is not only one of the most widely distributed plants—its fruits are borne in parachute-like containers that are carried by the wind—but also one of the most successful at dominating appropriate habitats.

Plant

Common reed is a vigorous growing plant that forms dense monotypic stands that consume available growing space and push out other plants including the native subspecies. It also alters wetland hydrology, increases the potential for fire and reduces and degrades wetland wildlife habitat due in part to its very dense growth habit. There is currently no evidence for of hybridization between native and introduced forms occurring in the field.A century ago the reed would have been part of a complex ecosystem comprised of many plant species, supporting a wide variety of animal life. Today it most likely dominates its habitat, forming a monoculture that is unnatural and uninviting for many of the animals that live in the marsh. The reed now acts as an invasive rather than a native species, destroying other natives and creating a vista that is nearly barren of other life forms.

Why and how it changed its behavior in the United States from that of an uncommon native marsh resident to that of a non-native has puzzled scientists for years.centuries, perhaps in the ballast of ships coming from Europe. Once here, they began spreading out across the continent, displacing the native plant and other native grasses, and forming monocultures where there had been healthy ecosystems. They are presently moving into the Great Plains, where they threaten to alter important habitat for several endangered speciesRecent research has come up with some answers to the mystery of the “uncommon” common reed in America. According to the N.C. Forest Service and a report by the state Department of Transportation, genetic testing shows that there are native and non-native families of phragmites growing in our coastal marshes. It is the non-native plants that are overtaking wetland ecosystems.(Source:coastalreview.org)

 

 

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