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Prairie Plants

Prairie Plants

Prairie Plants

These plants of the prairie provide a diversity of habitat and serve as nurseries for a variety of insects and beneficial birds. Many of these plants have been managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or the Prairie Plant Initiative in the last 100 years. These populations are managed by practices of intensive rotational grazing, fire suppression, controlled hunting, or prescribed burning of the plant species.True prairies in untamed western landscapes are largely populated by native, drought-tolerant grasses. Meadows, more common in the East, look similar but include a greater number of flowering perennials. Some native plants cross over between the two landscapes; these tend to be sun-loving, rugged, and low-maintenance. Here, a group of plants that stand out from the pack.

Prairie

This sturdy plant helped launch fresh interest in prairie flowers and has been hybridized into a rainbow of new colors. Get a true native variety, such as pale purple coneflower with drooping petals or a yellow Ozark coneflower, for long-lasting blooms and more drought tolerance. Deadhead spent flowers to keep drawing pollinators or let some go to seed, which attracts goldfinches. Welcome to Prairie Originals, where we specialize in growing native prairie wildflowers and native plants for landscaping. We can help you work with Mother Nature to create an environmentally-friendly wildflower garden that is beautiful, rewarding and easy to take care of. We sell indigenous Manitoba Prairie Wildflower Seeds and Native Prairie Plants, Grasses, Shrubs & Vines.

Manitoba Prairie Wildflowers, Manitoba Prairie Grasses and Native Prairie Shrubs and Vines help you create not just a flower garden but a sustainable, exciting community where you can share your space with nature's creatures like birds, butterflies, toads and frogs. Our native prairie plants provide the staples of life, food and shelter, and this encourages these fascinating visitors to stay and raise a family.Stand still and close your eyes in the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Dixon Prairie on a warm day in August and you’ll likely hear the hum of countless bees and the chirping of crickets and other insects. You may notice the wind rustle the leaves of tall switchgrass or the sharp “chip” calls of migrating birds as they search for seeds on coneflowers and coreopsis. (Source: www.chicagobotanic.org)

 

 

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