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Poplar tree identification

Poplar tree identification

Poplar tree identification

A large, deciduous tree that grows in the temperate regions of Europe and Asia. Poplars were introduced into North America in the early nineteenth century, where at one time the poplar was the most abundant tree in the United States.

Poplar

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations - The poplar - Its place in the world

poplar - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up) Quaking aspen, also known as trembling poplar (Populus tremuloides), is one of the most widely distributed trees in North America. It is known for its fluttering leaves and white bark marked with black scars. (Source:Poplars are rapid-growing but relatively short-lived trees. They are widely distributed throughout the northern temperate regions, ranging from North America through Eurasia and northern Africa. The leaves are alternate and oval or heart-shaped in outline, with finely to coarsely toothed margins (leaf edges). The leaves characteristically tremble in the breeze, because of their flat petioles (leaf stalks). In North America, aspens usually have nonsticky buds and smooth gray-to-green bark, whereas cottonwoods and balsam poplars have sticky buds and bark that is darker and deeply furrowed. Poplars are dioecious plants, meaning the male and female flowers grow on separate trees. The flowers bloom in drooping catkins (pendulous unisexual flower clusters) before the leaves emerge, to facilitate wind pollination. The fruits are small thick-walled capsules that contain many minute seeds clothed in cottony tufts of silky hairs. The seeds are often released in great quantities, and the fluffy seed hairs assist in wind dispersal. (Source:Two well-known poplar species of Eurasia are the white and black poplars. The (Source:white poplar (P. alba)—also known as silver poplar for its leaves, which have white felted undersides, and as maple leaf poplar for the leaves’ lobed margins—is widely spreading or columnar in form, reaching 30 metres (100 feet) in height. The (Source:gray poplar (P. ×canescens), a close relative of the white poplar, has deltoid (roughly triangular) leaves with woolly grayish undersides. The (Source:black poplar, or black cottonwood (P. nigra), has oval fine-toothed leaves, is long-trunked, and grows to a height of 35 metres (115 feet). Columnar black poplars are widely used in ornamental landscape plantings, particularly among the villas of Italy and elsewhere in southern Europe. White and black poplars are widely planted in the eastern United States and in Canada. (Source:balsam poplar, or tacamahac (P. balsamifera), which is native throughout northern North America in swampy soil, is distinguished by its aromatic resinous buds. The balm of Gilead poplar (P. ×jackii), which is similar, are used to make an ointment. The (Source:western balsam poplar, also called black cottonwood (P. trichocarpa), grows some 60 metres (195 feet) tall and is one of the largest deciduous trees of northwestern North America. (Source:buds of the (Source:The tulip trees of the genus Liriodendron (family Magnoliaceae) are sometimes referred to as tulip, or yellow, poplars. Known for their showy flowers and distinctive leaves, the genus consists of two species, the Chinese tulip tree (L. chinense), native to China and Vietnam, and the American tulip tree (L. tulipifera), found throughout eastern North America. (Source:…large end, great stands of poplar trees entirely connected by common roots are really a single organism. A variety of influences place an upper limit to the size of organisms. One is the strength of biological materials. Sequoia redwood trees, some of which exceed 90 metres (300 feet), are apparently… (Source:…and some plants, such as poplars and various bamboos, rely heavily on rhizomes for that purpose. In plants such as water lilies and many ferns, the rhizome is the only stem of the plant. In such cases, only the leaves and flowers are readily The western balsam poplar (P. trichocarpa) was the first tree whose full DNA code had been determined by DNA sequencing, in 2006. (Source:visible.… (Source:Populus is a genus of 25–30 species of deciduous flowering plants in the The seeds of the poplar tree are easily dispersed by the wind, thanks to the fine hairs surrounding them. (Source:family Salicaceae, native to most of the NPoplars and aspens are important food plants for the larvae of a large number of Lepidoptera species. Pleurotus populinus, the aspen oyster mushroom, is found exclusively on dead wood of Populus trees in North America. (Source:orthern Hemisphere. English names variously applied to different species include poplar (/ˈpÉ’plÉ™Populus section Populus – aspens and white poplar (circumpolar subarcPopulus alba – white poplar (southern Europe to central Asia) (Source:tic and cool temperate, and mountains farther south, white poplar warm temperate) (Source:r/), aspen, and cPopulus × canescens (P. alba × P. tremula) – grey poplar (Source:ottonPopulus section Aigeiros – black poplars, some of the cottonwoodsPopulus nigra – black poplar (Europe), placed here by nuclear DNA; cpDNA places it in sect. Populus (including Populus afghPopulus × canadensis (P. deltoides × P. nigra) – hybrid black poplar (Source:anica) (Source: (North America, Europe, western Asia; temperate) (Source:wood. (SourPopulus laurifolia – laurel-leaf poplar (central Asia) (Source:ce:Populus × petrowskiana ("CPopulus simonii – Simon's poplar (northeast Asia) (Source:zar's PPopulus balsamifer– Mongolian poplar (northeast Asia) (Source:a – Balsam poplar (northern North America) (= P. candicans, P. tacamahaca) Populus szechuanica – Sichuan poplar (northeast Asia), placed here by nuclear DNA; cpDNA places it in sect. Aigeiros (Source:(Source:oplar") in HeinolaPopulus angustifolia – willow-leaved poplar or narrowleaf cottonwood (central North America) (Source:, Finland (Source:Populus × inopina (P. nigra × P. fremoPopulus yunnanensis – Yunnan poplar (east Asia) (Source:ntii) – hybrid blaPopulus ussuriensis – Ussuri poplar (northeast Asia) (Source:Populus trichocarpa – western balsam poplar or black cottonwPopulus wilsonii – Wilson's poplar (eastern Asia) (Source:ood (western NorthPopulus lasiocarpa – Chinese necklace poplar (eastern Asia) (Source: America) (Source:Populus heterophylla – downy poplar (southeastern NorthPopulus section Turanga – subtropical poplars (southwest Asia, east Populus euphratica – Euphrates poplar (North Africa, southwest and central Asia) (Source:Africa; subtropical to tropical) (Source: America) (Source:ck poplar (Source:Populus section Leucoides – necklace poplars or bigleaf poplars (eastern North America, eastern Asia; warm temperate)

 

 

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