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Partridge pea native range

Partridge pea native range

Partridge pea native range

This wildflower provides bright summer color, and the flowers attract bees and butterflies. Seed pods are eaten by gamebirds and songbirds, and the plant provides excellent cover for gamebirds and browse for deer. Leaves collapse when touched, giving rise to the common name Sensitive-plant. Like other members of the pea family, Partridge-pea requires the presense of microorganisms that inhabit nodules on the plant's root system and produce nitrogen compounds necessary for the plant's survival.

Pea

A Prairie Moon • December 19 Keep in mind this is an annual species so it will live out its complete life cycle in one year then disappear. It should readily self-seed in appropriate environments. You can employ typical methods for overcoming animal browsing - increasing your seeding rate, fencing, hot pepper sprays, etc. You could try seeding Allium species with your partridge pea - the wild onions may deter unwanted feeders! The native Partridge Pea is widespread and locally common in Illinois, except in some northern counties, where it is uncommon or absent (see Distribution Map). Habitats include mesic to dry black soil prairies, sand prairies, savannas, limestone glades, abandoned fields, open areas along railroads and roadsides. Sometimes Partridge Pea is deliberately planted to stabilize banks around ditches and other areas, from where it frequently escapes. This plant favors disturbed areas.

The partridge pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata) is also known as "sleeping plant" or "sensitive plant." It was once classified as part of the Cassia genus so it is sometimes also known as golden cassia. Its small feathery leaves are greenish-yellow and tend to fold up when touched. Partridge pea has large, one-inch yellow flowers with brownish-red markings. The flowers attract bees that harvest the pollen and some butterflies, including Orange Sulphur and Sleepy Orange, use the plant as a host for their larvae.The partridge pea produces attractive maroon seed pods in autumn that are eaten by gamebirds (such as quail, turkey, and grouse), songbirds and other wildlife, including white tail deer, and these plants also provide cover for ground-feeding birds. It is often included in food plot seed mixes for its value as wildlife food. The partridge pea is actually a legume, and it fixes nitrogen in soil where it grows, making it beneficial to some lean soils. It has also been used to help prevent erosion and to help stabilize stream banks. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

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