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Pale Purple Coneflower

Pale Purple Coneflower

Pale Purple Coneflower

The pale-purple coneflower, also called asters, is a good ground cover for the deer-resistant perennial garden.Pale Purple Coneflower should be planted in well-drained soil in full to partial sunlight. Most native Coneflowers dislike soil that is kept excessively moist or has poor drainage and they will start to rot in these situations. Once the taproot is established it is extremely drought-tolerant and needs little care, but then also may be difficult to move. In the past all of the Purple Coneflowers were used as medicinal plants by the Native Americans. There is still a market for the roots, which are used to make herbal medicines and tonics.

Coneflower

The preference is full sun and average to dry conditions. The soil can contain loam, clay, or rocky material. There is a tendency for Pale Purple Coneflower to flop over when in bloom if it is pampered by too much water or lacks adequate support from adajacent vegetation. It doesn't seem to be bothered much by disease, and withstands drought very well. Development is slow unless ample sunlight is received. This plant can fail to survive the winter if the central taproot is not covered with sufficient soil.Pale Purple Coneflower should be planted in well-drained soil in full to partial sunlight. Most native Coneflowers dislike soil that is kept excessively moist or has poor drainage and they will start to rot in these situations. Once the taproot is established it is extremely drought-tolerant and needs little care, but then also may be difficult to move. In the past all of the Purple Coneflowers were used as medicinal plants by the Native Americans.

There is still a market for the roots, which are used to make herbal medicines and tonics.The showy daisy-like flowers of Pale Purple Coneflower bloom in early summer and are a favorite nectar source for pollinators, including butterflies and hummingbirds. Later in summer the large seed heads attract Goldfinches and other birds. Echinacea pallida is highly adaptable, tolerating drought, heat, humidity and poor soils, but it will not like soils that are too moist with poor drainage. Once established the deep taproot enables a long-lived, very low maintenance plant that is capable of handling hot dry situations with ease. This iconic prairie plant looks its best in a naturalized setting that includes other prairie flowers and grasses, or in a mixed border garden. Echinacea plants were used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes and are still used today in herbal medicine and tea. (Source: www.prairienursery.com)

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