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New Jersey Tea Plant

New Jersey Tea Plant

New Jersey Tea Plant

We’re constantly on the lookout for interesting, non-obvious, plants to review. This one ended up getting the golden ticket on our scam-o-meter.New Jersey-tea is a low, upright, deciduous shrub that grows to only 3 ft. tall. Pubescent leaves give the entire plant a grayish cast. Small white flowers occur in 2 in., branch-tip clusters. A low shrub with tiny white flowers in oval clusters rising from the leaf axils on the new shoots. The base is woody, while the upper portion of the plant is made up of herbaceous, spreading branches. Fall color is insignificant.New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus) features glossy leaves, numerous bright white flowers and a mounding shape that make this compact shrub a popular garden member. Planted two to three feet apart it forms an attractive low growing hedge, and is an excellent choice for rocky hillsides and slopes, as well. New Jersey Tea requires a well-drained site. The deep tap root makes it very drought tolerant once established. With a slow to moderate growth rate the long-lived plants will mature in 2 to 3 years.

Plant

The New Jersey Tea plant (Ceanothus americanus) does not tolerate juglone toxicity, a condition found in the environment beneath Black Walnut trees. The trees produce a chemical called hydrojuglone, which is found in the leaves, stems, fruit hulls, inner bark and roots. When exposed to the air or soil, hydrojuglone is oxidized into the chemical juglone. Juglone is toxic to many plants, but there are also plants that are resistant to the toxins.A deciduous shrub that grows just 3' tall and is compact and rounded by nature. The dried leaves of New Jersey Tea make a flavorful tea that was popular during the Revolutionary War. Deep tree-like roots of this shrub make it drought-tolerant but difficult to move once established so choose your spot wisely. Light preference is full or part sun and medium-dry soil. Deer and rabbits do like this shrub, especially when it is young so protect new transplants in the early years. The beautiful white flowers attract many pollinators. New Jersey Tea is one of the host plants of the Spring Azure.

A Prairie Moon • January 6 Thanks for your note, these requirements are hard to translate onto a seed packet sometimes. It is thought that if you plant outside in fall or winter, the seed coat may break open during the freeze/thaw cycle, so code "B" may not be necessary. However, you may see more even germination rates if you do the hot water treatment first before natural or artificial stratification. Maybe "B and C(60) OR Natural C" would be better.. but I don't know if we have the room on the packet for that!We dig plants when they are dormant from our outdoor beds and ship them April-May and October. Some species go dormant in the summer and we can ship them July/August. We are among the few still employing this production method, which is labor intensive but plant-friendly. They arrive to you dormant, with little to no top-growth (bare-root), packed in peat moss. They should be planted as soon as possible. Unlike greenhouse-grown plants, bare-root plants can be planted during cold weather or anytime the soil is not frozen. A root photo is included with each species to illustrate the optimal depth and orientation. Planting instructions/care are also included with each order. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

 

 

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