FutureStarr

Native plant nursery sydney

Native plant nursery sydney

Native plant nursery sydney

The traditional nursery industry has been following an ecologically destructive trajectory similar to the path of conventional agriculture. Most plants are mass produced using an arsenal of synthetic chemicals; many varieties are cloned or patented exotic species; and nursery outlets broker plants bought in, rather than propagating the plants themselves.

Plant

However, many people today want their yards and gardens to include species native to their region in order to provide habitat for native animals, including pollinators, and to function as part of their local ecosystem. This means they don’t want to have landscapes filled with cloned plants produced with poisonous chemicals. This creates the possibility of a niche market for nursery growers who produce native plants that are genetically diverse and free of synthetic chemicals. In the wild, most plants reproduce sexually, i.e., from seeds. Flowers are the reproductive organs of plants, and the insect pollinators assist in this process by transferring pollen between or among individual plants, creating genetic diversity. This genetic variation is a species’ best strategy for adapting to a future with a changing climate.

To create a nursery space, find a location with some shade that is separate from a major weed source, such as a field or weedy lot. A screen barrier can be erected to exclude weed seeds if this is your only option. Oak trees make an ideal canopy of shade for a native nursery. The north or east side of a building with a lath trellis also works well. If you plan to grow woodland species, you will need a nursery area with lots of shade. If you plan to grow meadow or wetland species, you want an area with at least half a day of sun to grow the plants on to a suitable size for sale.Each native seed has its own timetable for germination. This is very different from cultivated plants such as vegetables and annual flowers that have been bred for rapid germination. Native seed germination typically happens over a period of weeks, months or even years, to help disperse offspring over time – a better strategy for plants in the wild. (Source: www.mofga.org)

 

Related Articles