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Morning glory seedlings

Morning glory seedlings

Morning glory seedlings

Morning glories bloom from early summer to the first frost of fall. With slender stems and heart-shaped leaves, their trumpet-shaped flowers come in colors of pink, purple-blue, magenta, or white. Their fragrant, colorful flowers are not only attractive to our eyes but also beloved by butterflies and hummingbirds. If you cannot find a morning glory seedling at the right time of year, you can still cultivate the plant yourself in a pot or container. Plant the seed early in the morning, keeping in dark, moist location until it sprouts.

Morning

Native to Mexico and Central America, morning glory vines grow by clinging to nearby supports with tendrils, rapidly growing up to 12 feet or more a season. They can be planted by seed about a month before the last spring frost, and self-sow effusively, making it very likely they'll come back the following year. Though some gardeners find them too aggressive, unwanted seedlings can usually be pulled oMorning glories are a favorite of gardeners everywhere for good reason. The eye-catching vines are very low maintenance—they can be easily started from seed in early spring, and you don't need to prune or deadhead them as they grow. Have a trellis or other support in place wherever you plant your seeds and the vines will soon find the support and train themselves to grow up it. (Source:With regular watering, morning glories can start blooming by mid-summer, but many times they are slow to begin setting flowers, earning them the nickname "back to school vine." If you want to try and speed up the flowering time of morning glories you seed yourself, you can try sowing the seeds even earlier in the spring by scattering them on the frozen ground and even on snow.

Additionally, they require no special humidity needs.Sow the seeds about 1/4 inch deep, spaced a few inches apart. If you are planting a row of morning glories, six-inch spacing will be fine. If you are planting a trellis, you don't need to be too particular about spacing. Water the seeds well and keep the soil moist until thMorning glory vines are seldom bothered by insects or diseases, although they can contract several fungal problems if they experience a lot of wet weather, like leaf spot, stem rot, thread blight, and white blister. (SA bigger problem is four-footed animals who love to munch on their leaves. Deer, rabbits, and groundhogs can do a lot of damage to the lower vines, especially while they are young. Prevent them from getting to your morning glories by fencing around the lower three to five feet of the vines. The vines will eventually grow through the fencing and disguise it all together. At that point, if animals do a little browsing, it shouldn't kill the whole plant.(Source:www.thespruce.com)

 

 

 

 

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