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Minnesota Native Plants

Minnesota Native Plants

Minnesota Native Plants

Minnesota has over five thousand native plant species so extensive that some botanists consider it the #1 state for botany in the United States of America. Every square mile of Minnesota can be identified with a specific plant. Some of the plants of Minnesota grow from the ground. Others climb into the sky, or produce flower petals as high as telephone lines.This site is modeled after a field guide to help identify plants found in the wild. Flowers are primarily categorized by color, but there is an advanced plant search (see also in the top right corner of every page) where you can key on a variety of plant characteristics. Search results are organized by plant family and genus so similar species are usually grouped together.

Plant

We have been growing native wildflowers and grasses since 1992 and has been a Woman-owned and operated business since 1995. We are impressed with the beauty, vigor and usefulness of these native plants. Morning Sky Greenery is dedicated to helping preserve this important part of our natural heritage. We invite you to visit during our regular retail hours, or please call or email to make other arrangements. In Minnesota, native plants are also important because they have deep roots that break up compacted soil and allow more stormwater runoff to infiltrate into the ground. Because they’re better than non-native plants at soaking up stormwater, these plants are also more tolerant of drought conditions. Native plants can provide an attractive and cost-effective alternative to traditional lawns and landscapes that also benefits the environment. They typically require less water and fertilizer, and are more resistant to pests and diseases than non-native plants.

Most landscaping plants in nurseries are exotic species that are prized for qualities that make them poor food sources for wildlife. Exotic plants generally require more water and chemicals to thrive, increasing maintenance time, costs, and pollution. Some can even become invasive. By adding native plants to your yard, balcony, garden, or rooftop, you can help birds in the face of climate change, urban development, and other threats.Arisaema triphyllum (jack-in-the-pulpit, bog onion, brown dragon, Indian turnip, American wake robin, or wild turnip) is a herbaceous perennial plant growing from a corm, with three-parted leaves and flowers contained in a spadix that is covered by a hood. It is native to eastern North America, occurring in moist woodlands and thickets from Nova Scotia west to Minnesota, and south to southern Florida and Texas. Plants in early spring before the leaves have fully unfolded (Source: www.pinterest.com)

 

 

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