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Locoweed

Locoweed

Locoweed

Locoweed is a platform that builds communities of market suppliers by tracking user-generated content, providing valuable insights, and organizing and tracking local market events. This content is located on an app and in a blog on their website.locoweed, any of several species of poisonous plants of the genera Astragalus and Oxytropis, in the pea family (Fabaceae). Locoweeds are native to the prairies of north central and western North America and can pose a danger to livestock, horses, and other grazing animals. If ingested, the plants’ toxins produce frenzied behaviour, impaired vision, and sometimes death, though most locoweeds are unpalatable to livestock and are eaten only when other forage is unavailable. The level of toxicity appears to depend on soil conditions; decaying locoweeds release toxins sometimes taken up by otherwise harmless forage crops.

Locoweed

Locoweed has been reported to be the most widespread poisonous plant problem in the Western United States. It has a substantial economic impact, and may be responsible for the loss of more than $300 million in annual income due to deaths of poisoned livestock. The major contributors to these poisonings are plants from the Astragalus (Figure 1) and Oxytropis (Figure 2) genera, which are commonly referred to as locoweed or milkvetch. Since there are over 300 species of these plants found across the United States, this publication will not discuss the identification, distribution, or habitat of locoweeds; readers should refer to Circular 557, A Guide to the Common Locoweeds and Milkvetches of New Mexico (http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_circulars/CR557/welcome.html), for such information. Instead, this guide will focus on the toxicity found in horses.

Swainsonine, an indolizidine alkaloid, is the toxic principle responsible for the pathological changes in body tissues that lead to the disease known as locoism. All parts of the toxic plants (seeds, flowers, foliage, and even pollen) contain some level of swainsonine, and it has been reported that dried plant stems retain sufficient swainsonine content to pose serious health risks even after a year or longer. There is a wide variety of swainsonine concentrations among all the different species and varieties of locoweeds, and this makes it difficult to ascribe any standard level of toxicity potential to a single species. (Source::aces.nmsu.edu)

 

 

 

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