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Lobelia Perennial

Lobelia Perennial

Lobelia Perennial

Lobelia is a perennial plant that grows almost anywhere, producing beautiful, delicate flowers that seem to last forever. You can find it in fields, at the base of bushes, and along the sides of roads in North America. If you want to grow Lobelia, then you must start by preparing the soil.Commonly called cardinal flower, perennial lobelia is a super-easy North American native plant, especially if you have wet, swampy soil. Although it will grow in almost any sunny or partially sunny spot, perennial lobelia likes to have its feet wet so it's the perfect choice for low spots in your landscape that collect water after a rain. Perennial lobelia develops eye-popping, bright red flowers that attract droves of hummingbirds and butterflies throughout the summer. And add extra interest by scoping out varieties that have rich bronze or purple foliage throughout the growing season. The plant grows 18 to 24 inches tall and is relatively deer resistant. Hardy from zones 3-9.

Lobelia

Grow Perennial Lobelia: Part sun in most areas. Full sun in cool climates. Filtered shade in hottest climates. Ample water, rich soil. Tolerates average soil and boggy conditions. Probably the brightest red wildflower, hummingbirds love them, especially Ruby-Throated hummingbirds. The nectar-rich flowers also attract Swallowtail, Sulphur and a host of other butterflies. Cut flowers look great in the vase with Goldenrods and New York Asters. Plants are deer and rabbit resistant.A member of the bellflower family, the Lobelia genus consists of about 400 species, many hailing from the Americas. Lobelias are characterized by two-lipped, tubular flowers in almost every color imaginable, from white to bright blue, red and yellow. The most common lobelia perennial species are cardinal flower (L. cardinalis, USDA zones 3 through 9) and great blue lobelia (L. siphilitica, USDA zones 4 through 9), also called blue cardinal flower. Perennial hybrids include L. x speciosa (USDA zones 5 through 8).

Lobelia Cardinalis, the cardinal flower, however, seems to thrive in the warmth of midsummer. This native of eastern United States is a spiky, clump-forming perennial, reaching up to 4 feet tall with 1½-inch, brilliant flowers resembling a bird rising in flight. The intense flowers make an attractive accent to a garden. The native flower is a flaming scarlet, but hybrids are now available in white, salmon, and pink. Although they prefer light to partial shade, they have been flowering at the Wildflower Garden at Seaside Nature Park for more than five years now in full sun. fertilize Lobelia cardinalis every two weeks from midsummer to fall, as they appreciate a rich, moist soil. Since this is a moisture-loving plant, it is suitable for a wet or boggy area. Generally flowering in July, Lobelia Cardinalis may be propagated by cuttings, seeds or division. (Source: www.silive.com)

 

 

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