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Illinois Flower

Illinois Flower

Illinois Flower

Illinois provides a great example of the huge debate over drones: drones are a really cool idea and sure to improve our lives over time, but when should drones be used to deliver “good” news?In 1907 Illinois schoolchildren voted to select the violet as the state flower and the native oak as state tree (other contenders for state flower were the wild rose and goldenrod). There are eight different species of blue-flowering violets in Illinois; the most common is the dooryard violet (Viola sororia).The incentive for adopting state flowers was inspired during the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago. Illinois was the first of 4 eastern states to officially adopt the common violet as the state flower (Illinois, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Wisconsin).

Flower

The Dooryard Violet is one of the more interesting Violets as it does something quite unusual in the world of plants: it produces two different types of flowers at two different times of year. In spring these Violets produce the large recognizable flowers you always see in photos and wildflower guidebooks. After these have bloomed, the Violet produces small, closed flowers that look more like buds, closer to the ground on shorter stems. These flowers produce most of the Violet plant’s seeds.The common blue violet is the state flower of Illinois. It was officially adopted the state flower in 1908 following a campaign led by James C. Fessler. The flower is common across different places in the state. The violets tree grow on the prairie, lawns, wetlands, and woodlands of Illinois. The blooming period of the common blue violet is between mid to late spring. However, the flower is also common throughout the summer.

In 1907, at the suggestion of Mrs. James C. Fessler of Rochelle, who had launched a statewide campaign to adopt a state flower, the choice of a state flower and a state tree was put to a vote of Illinois schoolchildren.The wild rose gave the violet a run for its money, but the goldenrod never had a chance. State officials watched closely as over 33,500 votes were cast for three flowers; the goldenrod, the wild rose and the violet. The violet won the contest by accumulating almost 4,000 more votes than the second-place wild rose.The legislation did not specify a specific variety of violet but, according to the Illinois State Museum, the dooryard or common violet (Viola sororia) is the most common species in the state and was probably the intended "native violet" of Senator Jackson's Bill. In State Names, Flags, Seals, Songs, Birds, Flowers and Other Symbols (1939), Shankle suggested (Source: www.netstate.com)

 

 

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