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Hypericum prolificum for sale near faisalabad

Hypericum prolificum for sale near faisalabad

Hypericum prolificum for sale near faisalabad

Shrubby St. John's Wort is a herbaceous, perennial, deciduous or evergreen flowering shrub with a compact, dense habit, dark green leaves, and yellow flowers. It is one of around 400 species of Hypericum, which include herbs, shrubs, and trees, with different bloom times and cultural requirements. In nature, it is often found in open woods, bogs, hedge banks and grassland, dry sunny places, and usually on calcareous soils. The genus name comes from the Greek words hyper meaning above and eikon meaning picture in reference to the practice of hanging flowers from this genus above images, pictures or windows. The specific epithet means many or prolific in reference to the many stamens.

Hypericum

Shrubby St. John's Wort has attractive flowers and foliage. It differs from many other Hypericum spp. by its woody lower stems. It is easy to confuse this species with the woody Hypericum kalmianum (Kalm's St. John's Wort), which is restricted to sandy areas near the Great Lakes (including Lake Michigan in NE Illinois). This latter species has 5-celled seed capsules with 5 style-tips, while Shrubby St. John's Wort has 3-celled seed capsules with 3 style-tips. There are also species of St. John's Wort that have 1-celled seed capsules with singular style-tips; some of these may be slightly woody at the base. A widely cultivated woody species, Hypericum frondosum (Golden St. John' Wort), has larger flowers (greater than 1" across) and wider leaves (greater than �" across) than Shrubby St. John's Wort. Golden St. John's Wort is native to the southeastern states, but not Illinois. Another scientific name of Shrubby St. John's Wort is Hypericum spathulatum.

The flowers are cross-pollinated primarily by bumblebees, which collect pollen for their larvae. Other insect visitors that seek pollen from the flowers include Syrphid flies and Halictid bees, but they are less effective at cross-pollination. Sometimes butterflies and wasps land on the flowers, but they are vainly seeking nectar -- the flowers offer only pollen from the abundant stamens as a floral reward. Insects that feed destructively on Shrubby St. John's Wort and other Hypericum spp. include the aphid Aphis hyperici and other aphids, the leafhoppers Erasmoneura margaritae and Erasmoneura rubricata, Paria sellata and other leaf beetles, caterpillars of the butterfly Strymon melinus (Gray Hairstreak), caterpillars of Nedra ramosula (Gray Half-spot) and other moths, and Clastoptera hyperici (St. John's Wort Spittlebug). The Insect Table lists these species and many others. Most mammalian herbivores avoid consumption of Hypericum spp. because their foliage contains varying amounts of the phototoxic chemical, hypericin. In the presence of light, this chemical can cause rashes to develop on light-skinned animals and it can irritate the gastrointestinal tract. (Source: www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

 

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