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Hierochloe Odorata

Hierochloe Odorata

Hierochloe Odorata

This week we will be looking at the genus Hierochloe, which is an old name for the green-winged grasshopper, Hilara ceylonensis. These guys will eat up the most weedy parts of your garden, and the presence of their mated pairs make them a real nuisance—a plague!Hierochloe odorata is a very hardy perennial, able to grow to the Arctic Circle. Its leaves do not have rigid stems, so only grow to about 20 cm (7.9 in) in height, and then the leaves grow outward horizontally to 100 cm (39 in) long or more, by late summer. The base of the leaf, just below the soil surface, is broad and white, without hairs; the underside of the leaf is shiny and glabrous. In the wild, the bases of the leaves are frequently purple-red colored, and this indicates a phosphorus-deficient soil.

Odorata

The plant is harvested by cutting grass in early to late summer at the desired length. Hierochloe odorata harvested after the first frost has little or no scent and is less desirable for basketry. Basketweavers sun-dry cut sweet grass until it is dry and brittle. The brittle form of sweet grass must be soaked in warm water until it becomes pliable. The pliable grass is typically braided into thick threads and then redried for use.AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION: Walsh, Roberta A. 1994. Hierochloe odorata. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer).

https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/graminoid/hieodo/all.html []. Revisions: On 4 October 2018, the common name of this species was changed in FEIS from: sweet grass to: sweetgrass. Images were also added.ABBREVIATION: HIEODO SYNONYMS: NO-ENTRY NRCS PLANT CODE: HIOD COMMON NAMES: sweet grass sweet grass TAXONOMY: The scientific name of sweetgrass is Hierochloe odorata (L.) Beauv. (Poaceae) [12,14,15]. There are no infrataxa. LIFE FORM: Graminoid FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS: No special status OTHER STATUS: NO-ENTRY The name Hierochloe odorata is from the Greek and Latin. Hierochloe means "holy grass" and odorata means "fragrant". Some authors include Hierochloe in Anthoxanthum; in this case this species is given the epithet nitens to avoid confusion with a different species, Anthoxanthum odoratum, sweet vernal grass. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

 

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