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Hazelnut Trees for Sale

Hazelnut Trees for Sale

Hazelnut Trees for Sale

Order at least two varieties for cross pollination. Shipping to Oregon is restricted. The following named varieties are European hazelnuts (Corylus avellana). It is the only species grown commercially. Hazelnuts are also known as filberts. Hazels are propagated as layered trees on their own roots. Self-rooted or layered trees are the equivalent of a grafted tree, but have the advantage of being grown on their own roots. They can be grown as a tree by suppression of suckers, or as a multi-stemmed shrub. Growing hazelnuts as a shrub can make it easier to hand-harvest nuts as soon as they ripen, as they are ripe nearly a month before they drop. This may be necessary where jays and squirrels are common. Self-rooted hazelnuts will begin bearing quickly, often within 2 years. Seedlings will take 3-6 years. Turkish Tree hazels take 8-10 years to bear.

Tree

Selected as a late season pollinator variety, compatible with all our other varieties. Primarily used to pollinate the early blossoms of the very late blooming Jefferson along with the very late blooming Eta and Theta pollinators. Any of these 3 varieties will pollinate Jefferson. Commercial orchard plantings of Jefferson are using 4 Felix, 4 Theta and 2 Eta/acre as pollinators to maximize the yield of Jefferson. Felix Hazelnuts are of good quality and they blanch easily. Trees are vigorous and have the highest level of blight resistance. This variety is named after Felix Gillet, a founding father of nut tree orcharding on the Pacific Coast. A good replacement variety for Gamma or Halle's Giant.Produces a heavy yield of large, flavorful nuts that fill their shells well. Similar to the standard Barcelona variety, but with fewer blanks and with a low incidence of shriveled kernels and moldy nuts.

A long bloomer over a long receptive period. Oregon State University release with resistance to Eastern Filbert Blight disease and high resistance to big bud mite. Commercial orchardists are planting York or Yamhill to pollinate at the beginning of its receptive period, and Eta or Theta to cover the late blooming period, to ensure maximum potential yield. Seedlings were open pollinated with Yamhill and Eta, all blight resistant selections. As seedlings, Jefferson Hazelnut will be slower to come into bearing than cloned varieties and will be variable in nut size, yield and overall quality, though, with their superior genetics will tend to be vastly superior to average seedling hazelnuts. Seedlings are not meant for commercial production except as a rootstock for grafting. The seedlings are great for hedgerows, erosion control, wildlife plantings and backyard orchardists wanting economical trees. (Source: www.burntridgenursery.com)

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