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Full shade plants australia

Full shade plants australia

Full shade plants australia

The term full shade does not mean no sun. For horticultural purposes, a location is considered to be in full shade if it receives less than three hours of direct sun daily and receives filtered sun the rest of the day. Preferably, the hours of direct sun occur in the cooler hours of the morning with filtered protection from intense sun in the late afternoon.

Shade

You might easily overlook shrubs when planning a shade garden (many gardeners gravitate toward annual and perennial flowering plants). But do not forget about shrubs, they provide structure and background for that planting bed you are so eager to fill with the smaller, more showy plants that tend to jump out at you at the garden center. The following shrubs are evergreens grown for their foliage and they can add great value to a shade garden. Options for shade-tolerant vines are somewhat limited, particularly if you are in search of a flowering vine that is hardy in a cold-winter climate. Boston ivy is grown for its foliage, not its flowers. Unhappily, that foliage is not as colorful in fall if it is grown in full shade. But the vibrant green foliage it provides in summer adds elegance to a shady nook. Meanwhile, climbing hydrangea does flower nicely even when grown in full shade, making it the favorite vine for gardeners in the cold climates.

Mainly a foliage plant, Hostas are perfect for shade gardens with moist soil. They come in various sizes from as mini as 4 inches to as big as 6 feet long. But beware: Deer, rabbits, slugs, and snails love these plants. If there are lots of deer near where you're thinking about planting them, you might want to reconsider!These annuals are one of the only plants that will put on a floral display in full shade. Downside: Some types are susceptible to powdery mildew, a devastating disease that kills the plants and overwinters in the soil for years! If you've had problems in the past, look for other types (such as New Guinea impatiens) and new hybrids that are more disease-resistant. (Source: www.housebeautiful.com)

 

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