FutureStarr

Evergreen ground coveror

Evergreen ground coveror

Evergreen ground cover

As summer approaches, many homeowners struggle with what to plant and where to plant it. If you’re struggling with the same conundrum, then our ground cover post is for you.Groundcovers are low-growing plants that serve many different purposes in the landscape. They limit weed growth, stabilize slopes, and add interest and texture to your yard. Plus, unlike lawn, groundcover plants don’t have to be mowed. However, in colder climates, many groundcovers die back and go dormant during the winter months. This leaves the ground bare and exposed, opening it up to potential weed issues and soil erosion. If you’d like to provide year-round cover for a particular garden area, turn to evergreen groundcover varieties for the job. These beautiful, hard-working plants have so much to offer.

Plant

While pachysandra, ivy, and myrtle/periwinkle are among the most common evergreen groundcover plants, you’ll notice all three of them are absent from the list of varieties I’m about to introduce you to. Yes, those three groundcover species are good choices for a broad range of climates, but, well…. let’s talk frankly here… they are everywhere. If you’re anything like me, I’d much rather have a hardy, gorgeous evergreen groundcover that’s not already blanketing every other garden in my neighborhood.The thick, succulent, drought-resistant leaves of sedums make them among the very best evergreen groundcovers. While there are literally hundreds of different varieties, if you plan to use this plant as a groundcover, look for low-growing varieties.

Some of my favorites are Dragon’s Blood, Blue Spruce, and Lime Twister® because of their interesting foliage and flower colors. These ground-hugging sedums are evergreen in climates with milder winters, and semi-evergreen down to -20 degrees F. Reaching just 4 inches tall, they’re covered in blooms in late summer through fall. In my Pennsylvania garden, they’re evergreen through most of the winter.Once an exceedingly popular garden plant, candytuft seems to have fallen out of favor in recent years, for some unknown reason. What’s not to love about an evergreen groundcover that spreads relatively fast, is covered with clusters of white flowers, is adored by pollinators, and is hardy down to -30 degrees and perhaps beyond? The only fuss-factor with Candytuft is its desire for well-drained soils and full sun. Shearing the plant back after bloom keeps it even more compact, but the practice isn’t necessary. (Source:savvygardening.com)

 

 

Related Articles