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Eupatorium Maculatum

Eupatorium Maculatum

Eupatorium Maculatum

Eupatorium maculatum is mostly known as wildcat or spit root. This plant is found in the South and Southeast U.S. It is often found growing in moist sour places, such as marshes, moist woods, seeps, and bogs. The plant has a minty-camphor-like smell that is quite strong. Like many other herbs, it is said that wildcat will send cats running.Combines beautifully in striking color combinations with other perennial plants such as Asters, Helianthus or ornamental grasses. Very useful and adaptable in the garden, this is an excellent choice as an accent plant, or for borders, cottage gardens, meadows, wild gardens, rain gardens. Good as cut flowers too!

Plant

Joe-Pye Weeds are bold, architectural specimen plants, perfect for making a statement in the border. Plants form huge clumps of coarse green leaves, bearing enormous umbrella-like heads of rosy-purple flowers in late summer. This selection very tall and wide, the flowers held on deep purple stems. A magnet to butterflies, this is also suitable for planting in a meadow or at the waterside. Excellent for cutting.3-6 feet tall unbranched native perennial plant bearing branched flower stalks at the top. Main stem is purple or purple-spotted, stout and round, often covered with fine white hairs. Whorls of 4 or 5 yellowish green leaves occur along the central stem Leaves up to 8 long and 2� across, ovate to narrowly ovate with serrated margins and conspicuous veins.

Pink or purple flowers occur in flat-headed clusters several inches across containing 8-20 disk florets and no ray florets. Fruit an achene with hair-like bristles dispersed by the wind.Eutrochium maculatum is an herbaceous native perennial wildflower, commonly known as Joe Pye Weed or Queen of the Meadow, that is useful as a tall plant in wet spaces. It displays clusters of purple blossoms through summer into fall. Joe Pye Weed prefers moist to wet soil and does best in sun to partial shade. This plant is resistant to damage by deer. It does best in average, medium to wet soils in full sun, but tolerates some light afternoon shade in hot summer climates. You can cut the plants to the ground in late winter. The root system is fibrous and rhizomatous. This plant often forms small clonal colonies. You can divide the plant in spring or fall and replant to a new site. (Source: plants.ces.ncsu.edu)

 

 

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