FutureStarr

Epilobium Ciliatum

Epilobium Ciliatum

Epilobium Ciliatum

This tiny flower, discovered in 1842 and now called the fireweed, was heralded as a plant capable of turning a desolate, desert landscape into a verdant and fertile meadow.Epilobium ciliatum is native to the southern part of Canada and most of the United States of America. It arrived in northern Europe early in the 20th century and spread rapidly, reaching Finland in about 1920. It is a plant of moist places, stream-sides, ditches, ponds, gardens, roadsides, recently cleared areas and wasteland.Epilobium ciliatum is a clumping perennial often exceeding 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) in height. It has thickly veined lance-shaped leaves which may be up to 15 centimeters long toward the base of the plant. The foliage, stem, and inflorescence are covered in bristly hairs and glands.

Epilobium

Fringed willow-herb. 2a. Epilobium adenocaulon Hausskn.; E. adenocaulon Hausskn. var. ecomosum (Fassett) Munz; E. americanum Hausskn.; E. ciliatum Raf. var. ecomosum (Fassett) Boivin; E. glandulosum Lehm. var. adenocaulon (Hausskn.) Fern.; E. glandulosum Lehm. var. ecomosum Fassett; 2b. Epilobium adenocaulon Hausskn. var. cinerascens (Piper) M.E. Peck; E. adenocaulon Hausskn. var. occidentale Trel.; E. boreale Hausskn.; E. ciliatum Raf. ssp. glandulosum (Lehm.) Hoch & Raven; E. glandulosum Lehm.; E. glandulosum Lehm. var. cardiophyllum Fern.; E. glandulosum Lehm. var. occidentale (Trel.) Fern.; E. tetragonum L. var. glandulosum (Lehm.) Torr. & Gray •Willowherbs are in the Onagraceae family. They are annuals that are more common in cool regions but occur occasionally as a cool-season weed in warmer areas. Seedlings are small and slow to establish, but once established, plants elongate to 18 inches tall. This weed is becoming more prevalent in container nurseries, likely spreading in contaminated nursery crops.

Epilobium ciliatum is a species of willowherb known by the common names Fringed Willowherb and American Willowherb. This plant is found in many parts of the world. It is native to much of North America and eastern Asia, and it is an introduced species in much of Eurasia and Australia. It may be found in a great variety of habitats, including disturbed areas and roadsides. This is a clumping perennial often exceeding one and a half meters in height. It has thickly veined lance-shaped leaves which may be up to 15 centimeters long toward the base of the plant. The foliage, stem, and flower cluster are covered in bristly hairs and glands. The trumpet-shaped flowers have four petals which are so deeply notched they look like four pairs. They are white to light purple or pink with dark veining. The fruit is a narrow, hairy capsule up to 10 centimeters in length, and it may be held on a long stalk. (Source: calscape.org)

 

 

Related Articles