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Eleocharis Acicularis

Eleocharis Acicularis

Eleocharis Acicularis

Eleocharis acicularis is an annual or perennial spikesedge with long, grasslike stems to about 15 centimeters in height, shorter in bog conditions, from a creeping rhizome. In shallow water it will form short spikes of tiny flowers amongst flat overlapping bracts. The tiny flowers are less than five millimeters in diameter and are borne at the tip of each stem in single, sharply pointed, lanceoloid spikelets up to about six millimeters long. This is a plant of marshes, vernal pools, and bogs.

Eleocharis

To keep your Eleocharis acicularis looking its best, provide medium to high light. In low-light conditions it will start to etiolate and grow too tall to work as a carpeting plant. Extra nutrients in the form of root tabs, Co2 and liquid plant food are definitely appreciated. Be sure to keep an eye out for any deficiencies by regularly testing your water. Keep in mind that very fine sand or very coarse gravel aren't ideal for this plant: a coarse sand works best and allows the roots to take hold and spread quickly.Regular trimming is a must with any carpet plant and this is no different for Eleocharis acicularis. Cutting the tops of the leaves helps it maintain its grassy look and actually stimulates new growth. If you want to expand your carpet you can always separate a few clumps and replant them in different places - this plant will spread by itself but it can take a while before it covers the entire bottom!

Eleocharis acicularis is one of the most common Spikerushes both in Minnesota and globally, found across Europe, Asia, North America and into South America. It has both aquatic and terrestrial forms and is a popular plant in aquariums, the dense mats considered good habitat for fish to lay their eggs. It has also been found to absorb heavy metals and may prove beneficial in wetland remediation efforts as well as a process known as phytomining, where these metals are harvested from plants.Aquatic forms more closely resemble those of Eleocharis robbinsii, which have limp, thread-like stems and reddish rhizomes, where E. acicularis stems are more stiff and rhizomes are white. Also similar is Schoenoplectus subterminalis, which has alternate, bladed leaves (not bladeless sheaths) that are compressed and have distinct cross-partitions. Magnification may be required to see these traits. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

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